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Olympus Stylus 1

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From Photography Monthly we have a review of the new Olympus

Big camera handling meets compact size, the premium Olympus Stylus 1 is said to be the first of its kind.

There is a lot of choice in the “compact” camera market right now but nothing that combines a larger high quality sensor with a versatile zoom range and full manual control yet remains truly pocketable. Olympus engineers were determined the Stylus 1 would stand out for its excellent quality. Of course they applied the same high standards to the compact design. The Stylus 1 is a genuinely portable, slim, ‘anytime anywhere’ camera with the manual controls, eye-to-the-viewfinder stability and picture quality to satisfy the most discerning photographers, be they compact enthusiasts or D-SLR owners looking for a more compact, second camera.

A larger 1/1.7-inch BSI CMOS sensor heads an impressive list of credentials that includes a new and versatile, ultra-slim, constant-aperture 1:2.8 10.7x (28-300mm*) high-power i.ZUIKO DIGITAL lens and a high-performance TruePic VI image processor. A premium high-definition electronic viewfinder, Fast AF and shoot-and-share WiFi round off a persuasive semi-pro package.

The Stylus 1 is available in classic black for £549.99, from late November 2013.

The Stylus 1 at a glance

Ambitious photographers demand excellentpicture quality. One look at the Stylus 1 spec sheet and you know you’ve found it. Despite a casing depth of just 52mm, it has a brand new 28-300mm* high-power i.ZUIKO DIGTAL lens that offers a constant 1:2.8 aperturefrom wide to telephoto shots, with a 10.7x optical zoom. Olympus designed this lens to work seamlessly with its large-format BSI CMOS sensor, as well as the TruePic VI image processor that is already familiar to users of its high-end OM-D E-M5 system camera. Other tried-and-tested OM-D features include the rock-solid handling and grip that comes from the D-SLR-style casing and layout. For accurate and professional framing, there is the large,1.44 million dot electronic viewfinder, Fast AF for near-instant, precision focusing via touch screen and built-in WiFi for real-time smartphone access– likewise all OM-D-proven. The Stylus 1 has superb dynamic range and low-light capability, plus the same Hybrid Control Ring for manual or digital control of key settings that has proved so successful on the Olympus XZ series.

Want to read more?

If you need more technical information then DP Review is the place to go

This is their astute opening to the review

The rapid collapse of the compact camera market has pushed all the major manufacturers to look for new markets – to create reasons for people to still need a ‘real’ camera as well as a smartphone. At one end of the spectrum, this has meant attempts at ‘social’ cameras, such as Canon’s PowerShot N but, more interesting to us, it’s meant much more capable, higher-end cameras, such as Sony’s Cyber-shot RX100. The latest example is Olympus’s range-topping Stylus 1.

It’s probably the most capable compact the company has made – a feature-packed, flexible camera with a lot of direct control and the longest zoom range we can remember seeing on a camera with a 1/1.7″-type sensor. In terms of styling, it’s been modeled on the company’s excellent OM-D E-M5, but in concept it’s perhaps closer to being a super XZ-2 – the company’s erstwhile top-end enthusiast model.

Canon 6D First Review

Hot on the heels of the new Nikon D600 comes the Canon 6D, bit like buses…. Calumet Photo are quoting about £1800 for the body only

The 6D is apparently not a replacement for the 5D but a stable mate designed with features for landscape, travel and outdoor photographers. It is lighter than the 5D so easier to carry around and has geo-location GPS facilities so you can tag images with their exact location and built in wifi for transmitting and sharing images. Here are some details

A 20.2-megapixel DSLR featuring a full-frame sensor and compact design. Ideal for portrait, landscape and travel photography, offering tight control over depth of field and a large choice of wide-angle EF lenses.

  • Enjoy the full-frame advantage with a 20.2 megapixel CMOS sensor, for a wider choice of wide-angle lenses, great image quality, and more depth-of-field control
  • Tough magnesium-alloy body and compact design
  • Great in low-light. Shoot at max ISO 25,600 (expandable to ISO 102,400) and with precise AF, even in conditions as dark as -3EV
  • Follow the action with 11-point AF and 4.5 fps shooting
  • Built-in GPS geotags images with location
  • Wirelessly control and download from your camera with built-in Wi-Fi • 14-bit DIGIC 5+ processor for accurate colour reproduction
  • Shoot Full-HD video
  • Live View composition on a 1,040,000-dot 7.7cm (3.0″) ClearView LCD screen
  • The ever reliable people at DP Review have a full preview available here

The EOS 6D is best seen as a full frame version of the EOS 60D – indeed it’s very similar in both control layout and dimensions. Its front profile is very similar to the Nikon D600, but it’s rather slimmer front-to-back, and lighter too. However it differs from the Nikon in a number of key respects; for example it has Wi-Fi and GPS built-in, while the D600 offers a distinctly higher spec’ed autofocus system, dual card slots and a built-in flash.

The EOS 6D is built around a new Canon CMOS sensor, which offers a pixel count of 20.2MP (compared to the D600 and A99’s 24MP, or the 5D Mark III’s 22MP). In concert with the DIGIC 5+ processor it offers a standard ISO range of 100-25600, expandable down to 50 and up to 102,400. The AF system has 11 points, but only the central one is cross-type (i.e. sensitive to both vertical and horizontal detail). However according to Canon to will operate at extremely low light levels; right down to -3 EV – a stop dimmer than the 5D Mark III.

The EOS 6D’s most eye-catching additions are integrated GPS and Wi-Fi – their first appearance on a Canon SLR. The GPS unit includes exactly the same functionality as on the company’s compacts – it can embed location data into every image, and has a logging function that can keep track of where you’ve been through the day. This, we suspect, will be most-popular with landscape and travel photographers.

The integrated Wi-Fi unit has the basic functionality you might expect, allowing transfer of images to a smartphone or tablet, and direct upload to social media sites such as Facebook and YouTube. You can also send images directly to a Wi-Fi-enabled printer. But we think more photographers are likely be interested by the fact that it can also be used to turn your smartphone into a wireless remote control via Canon’s EOS Remote app for iOS or Android, complete with live view and full control of exposure settings.

The EOS 6D gains Canon’s silent shutter mode that we saw on the 5D Mark III, which offers quieter, more discreet shooting. It gets in-camera HDR and Multiple Exposure modes, but disappointingly these are JPEG only, unlike on the 5D Mark III that also records RAW files. There’s also a single-axis electronic level to check for wonky horizons. READ THE FULL PREVIEW

You may find this comparison site useful as well as the DP Review pages, this lists the differences between the Nikon D600 and the Canon 6D

Memory cards – things you need to know

“Photographers are gearheads.  We love to know what the latest-and-greatest technology is and what piece of gear will produce optimal results.  I admit it.  I love the technology side of photography and I enjoy pixel peeping even when I know it doesn’t really help my photos.  Surprisingly, however, I am frequently shocked at how clueless photographers are about memory cards.” this comes from the Improve photography site, they have lots of good posts, you might want to follow them, here is the rest of this post about memory cards