Oxford School of Photography

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Tag Archives: United States

Timelapse Photography: A Complete Guide for Beginners

If you’re not familiar with timelapse videos, you’ve probably already seen them but just aren’t aware of it. With timelapse photography, you can take sequential photos captured over a period of hours and compress them into a video of only a few minutes in length – this allows you to see a slowly changing scene at a much faster pace and can open up a whole new world of photography to you.  In theory, timelapse videos are easy to do with your camera – you’re simply taking a few hundred photos, one after another, and then lining them up in post processing. However, to get a stunning, seamless timelapse video, there’s much more involved than spending a few hours behind the lens. By at Lightstalking

Ben Peck

Really astonishing landscape pictures by Christian Klepp

“Geoscientist and photographer Christian Klepp runs this website project to document nature’s beauty. The aim is to increase public awareness of the earth system, so that people can develop a clearer understanding of the planet. Over 200 images of spectacular landscapes accompanied by scientific explanations illustrate the perpetual change of our planet through the eons of time. ”

This website is crammed with the most amazing images, even in landscape photography leaves you cold you need to have a look at this site

Photographing in public: When the police gets it wrong

Who would you count on to know and understand the law, probably a member of the police I would guess. Here is a sorry tale from the ‘ police don’t know what they are talking about’  folder. The people over at Photocritic.org have a tale from an amateur photographer who was given a right run around by the police for doing something that is completely legal. Here is the start of the article which in it’s fullness is shocking

“A few days ago, I received an e-mail from a reader who had been through an interesting ordeal by the hands of UK police. They wanted a bit of advice, and I figured more of you might like to learn a little bit more about what happens when you are given a stern talking to by police about taking photos in a public place.”...more

I wrote about this problem recently and if you have a look here you will find a full and reasoned article from a person who does understand the law, I would suggest you download it and print it off it is from the Sirimo people and is called UK Photographers Rights. You can show it to the ignorant person who tells you that you cannot take pictures here.

Three Essential Skills for Today’s Wedding Photographer

Times….they are a changin’.

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’ve probably heard some of the doom and gloom that’s been rumbling in our industry. And although the photo industry is different than it used to be, this isn’t necessarily bad news. The photographers who are able to successfully navigate the changing industry landscape are still running successful businesses and have adapted to ensure that their business will still be around in the years to come. Whether you’re just jumping in and are new to the industry or you’re a seasoned pro, here are three essential skills that will help you succeed.…more  Written by Katie Humphreys

NATURA SERIES Photographs by Carlos Plaza

  • “Natura” is a series of images I have created in the past five years, using natural objects I find anywhere, anytime. It could be some banana leaves I found doing yard work, or a broken sea shell during my morning run on the beach, or a sunflower from an arrangement that dried out in the Florida heat.

    Whatever it is, I pick it up and make an image of it. I love Nature, and for the past 20 years have tried to stay in touch and close contact with her. These images are my tribute to the Mother of all Mothers…!

    “I have discovered photography. Now I can kill myself. I have nothing else to learn.” – Pablo Picasso

more of Plaza’a pictures here

20 Inspirational and Free Downloadable Photography Magazines

“Inspiration is important for photographers, web and visual designers. It’s what gives you new ideas, shapes and influences your style, and energizes and increases your passion for visual art. And visual art that’s of a different medium from yours can be an even greater inspiration—like photography—since you’re getting a fresh outside perspective.”………..check out what magazines you can download here

How To Bring Out Authentic Emotion in Your Shoots

This husband and wife, The Youngrens wedding photography team write excellent articles usually posted on Pictage

“Jeff and I were just in San Francisco this past week and in the course of four days we shot three engagement sessions for three incredibly unique and beautiful couples. Each couple was very different from the others – their stories were distinct and their personalities were one of kind.

We absolutely LOVE that all of our couples have such unique stories and personalities – we wouldn’t trade this job for anything – but photographing so many different types of personalities can also be challenging, right? Wouldn’t it be so much easier if every one of our couples responded the same way to our jokes? If they all looked great in the same type of poses? If their senses of humor all clicked perfectly with ours? If every groom thought that Jeff’s monkey dance was super awesome and NOT totally lame?

The truth is that we have to connect with each of our couples on a level that makes them comfortable and allows them to relax, but it’s not easy discovering what those levels are when everyone is so unique.”………more

Dorothea Lange ……..the greatest American documentary photographer

Dorothea Lange (1895-1965) has been called the greatest American documentary photographer. She is best known for her chronicles of the Great Depression and for her photographs of migratory farm workers. Below are pre-World War II photographs, taken for the U.S. Farm Security Administration (FSA), investigating living conditions of families hired to work in cotton fields and farms in Arizona and California. Many of the families had fled the Dust Bowl, the lengthy drought which devastated millions of acres of farmland in Midwestern states such as Oklahoma.

Lange was educated in photography in New York City, in a class taught by Clarence H. White. She was informally apprenticed to several New York photography studios, including that of the famed Arnold Genthe. In 1918, she moved to San Francisco, and by the following year she had opened a successful portrait studio. She lived across the bay in Berkeley for the rest of her life. In 1920, she married the noted western painter Maynard Dixon

With the onset of the Great Depression, Lange turned her camera lens from the studio to the street. Her studies of unemployed and homeless people captured the attention of local photographers and led to her employment with the federal Resettlement Administration (RA), later called the Farm Security Administration (FSA).

In December 1935, she divorced Dixon and married agricultural economist Paul Schuster Taylor, Professor of Economics at the University of California, Berkeley. Taylor educated Lange in social and political matters, and together they documented rural poverty and the exploitation of sharecroppers and migrant laborers for the next five years — Taylor interviewing and gathering economic data, Lange taking photos.

From 1935 to 1939, Lange’s work for the RA and FSA brought the plight of the poor and forgotten — particularly sharecroppers, displaced farm families, and migrant workers — to public attention. Distributed free to newspapers across the country, her poignant images became icons of the era

Lange’s best-known picture is titled “Migrant Mother.” The woman in the photo is Florence Owens Thompson.

In 1960, Lange spoke about her experience taking the photograph:

I saw and approached the hungry and desperate mother, as if drawn by a magnet. I do not remember how I explained my presence or my camera to her, but I do remember she asked me no questions. I made five exposures, working closer and closer from the same direction. I did not ask her name or her history. She told me her age, that she was thirty-two. She said that they had been living on frozen vegetables from the surrounding fields, and birds that the children killed. She had just sold the tires from her car to buy food. There she sat in that lean-to tent with her children huddled around her, and seemed to know that my pictures might help her, and so she helped me. There was a sort of equality about it.

In 1941, Lange was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship for excellence in photography. After the attack on Pearl Harbor, she gave up the prestigious award to record the forced evacuation of Japanese Americans to relocation camps, on assignment for the War Relocation Authority (WRA). She covered the rounding up of Japanese Americans and their internment in relocation camps, highlighting Manzanar, the first of the permanent internment camps. To many observers, her photograph of Japanese-American children pledging allegiance to the flag shortly before they were sent to internment camps is a haunting reminder of this policy of detaining people without charging them with any crime or affording them any appeal. 

Her images were so obviously critical that the Army impounded them. Today her photographs of the internment are available in the National Archives on the website of the Still Photographs Division, and at the Bancroft Library of the University of California, Berkeley.

Dorothea Lange (May 26, 1895 – October 11, 1965)


Forgotten Detroit – 100 Abandoned Houses

You may already know of the decline of Detroit, from a once vibrant industrial city it is now being abandoned by large numbers of the population which is leaving many house empty and falling into decay. This is a worrying story of post industrial decline and it must ask the question; where else and where next. This article discusses that decline if you are interested in learning more. But these pictures of houses, falling to decrepitude are a haunting site and more can be seen here where there is a link to the hundred images of the title.

In Detroit, the number of abandoned houses is around 12.000, encompassing an area of 138 square miles ! People are leaving Detroit and soon people will rename the city with the name : Forgotten Detroit ! The news this week that Detroit’s population plunged more than 25% to just 714,000 in the last decade shouldn’t be surprising. The city’s collapse is as well-documented as it is astonishing – the population peaked at nearly 2 million in the 1950s, driven in part by a post-World War II auto industry boom now long gone.

Lyndale

Lyndale Avenue is the longest street in Minneapolis; the only street extending from the northern city limits to the southern city limits. It cuts through the center of town, offering the harried commuter a curious blend of strip malls, motels, laundromats, and dive bars. There’s houses too…….The backyard is our fortress, a sanctuary away from the river of noise, fenced in by our neighbor’s yards. This project is a portrait of my family, and our modern life, on Lyndale.

David Bowman

pictures here