Oxford School of Photography

insights into photography

Tag Archives: Tim Hetherington

TIM HETHERINGTON: YOU NEVER SEE THEM LIKE THIS – Exhibition

About Tim Hetherington: You Never See Them Like This

NYC116981-492x328

Two years after his death, Open Eye Gallery pays tribute to the work of Liverpool-born photojournalist Tim Hetherington (1970 – 2011) in an exhibition of photography and film work. The show is presented in collaboration with the Tim Hetherington Trust and Magnum Photos.

Drawing from the series of images published in his acclaimed book Infidel (Chris Boot Ltd, London 2010), which offers an intimate insight into the lives of American soldiers in conflict but beyond the action of war, almost 30 of Hetherington’s genre-defying photographs will be reproduced in varying scale, including a number of billboard formats.

The exhibition’s title, You Never See Them Like This, is a quote by Tim Hetherington talking to his creative collaborator Sebastian Junger (a journalist and his co-director on the Oscar-winning documentary film, Restrepo), describing the revelation he had looking at the sleeping soldiers: “They always look so tough… but when they’re asleep they look like little boys. They look the way their mothers probably remember them.”

Set against the unexpectedly beautiful landscape of the Korengal Valley, Afghanistan, Hetherington’s still images follow the arrival, efforts and advancement of a US contingent in establishing an outpost in this North Eastern part of Afghanistan. The work highlights the long-term nature of Hetherington’s photographic projects, his interest in narrative, human connection and the close relationships he developed with his subjects.

As days of intense conflict are broken up by long periods of waiting, the photo-reporter explores how these soldiers cope with this emotionally draining existence. Looking at how they build up resilience, renegotiate their relations and manage their feelings, Hetherington ultimately documents the formation of a strong brotherhood consolidated over a period of one year, underpinned by themes including sexuality, alienation/isolation and the sense of loss and fear.

Tim Hetherington: You Never See Them Like This is supported by the Mayor of Liverpool.

NYC116680-531x328

6 SEPT – 24 NOV 2013

Open Eye Gallery
19 Mann Island
Liverpool Waterfront
Liverpool, L3 1BP

Details here

NYC116871-492x328

Exploring Colonel Muammar Gaddafi’s photography archives

In the BJP this week there is an very interesting article by Olivier Laurent about photographic archives found in Libya after the fall of the tyrant Gaddafi. The images shown are effectively copies made by the photographers working for Human Rights watch who found them, this leads to a debate about the ownership of the images and the considerations of copyright, some comments arguing that the copying of images and crediting them to the copier feels a bit wrong because the original photographer has rights too. Anyway if you read the article you will be able to read the debate and  the comments and add to the discussion if you wish, this is how the article starts

Colonel Gaddafi in air force uniform at an Arab Summit in Tripoli, Libya December 02, 1977. Image © Courtesy of Michael Christopher Brown/Human Rights Watch.

For the past year, Human Rights Watch has been compiling documents and images found after the fall of Libya’s authoritarian regime in a bid to secure an important passage of the country’s history. Now a selection of these artefacts – named The Gaddafi Archives – is set to go on show at the London Festival of Photography. Olivier Laurent reports……

In the first months of last year, as Colonel Muammar Gaddafi’s stronghold on Libya slowly crumbled, staff from Human Rights Watch came upon hundreds of discarded documents, including images from the regime’s secret police’s archives, as well as the dictator’s own family albums. “When we arrived in Benghazi in February 2011, we found that many of these documents were being burned,” the NGO’s emergencies director Peter Bouckaert told BJP last year. “Almost all of them had been burned already,” he says, so it was a race against time.

“One day we were approached by a Libyan man who had rescued some images from the State Security Services buildings,” photographs that literally smelled of smoke, Bouckaert recalls. “They had been taken out of the building as it was being burned down by the rebels.” Mindful that his organisation could not remove the images from the country, Bouckaert set about documenting them with the help of photographers such as Thomas Dworzak, Michael Christopher Brown and the late Tim Hetherington. Now, eight months after the fall of Tripoli and Gaddafi’s death, a selection of these photographs, documents, artefacts and videos will go on show in the UK at the London Festival of Photography. Curated by Susan Glen, the exhibition aims “to look behind the ‘grip-and-grin’ smiles of the political photo-op propaganda to reveal what was really going on” in Libya, she says…….MORE

Colonel Gaddafi and Leonid Brezhnev, General Secretary of the Soviet Union, holding hands in Moscow, April 27th, 1981. Image © Courtesy of Michael Christopher Brown/Human Rights Watch.

For more information, visit www.hrw.org and www.lfph.org.

Tim Hetherington

Tim Hetherington, the British photojournalist, who was killed with his colleague Chris Hondros in a mortar blast in Misurata, Libya, on April 20 aged 40, specialised in bringing the viewer close to the terrible truths of battle; last year he won an Oscar nomination for best documentary for the Afghanistan war film Restrepo. Through still photographs, films, videos and internet downloads, Hetherington, who did much work with Human Rights Watch, sought to bridge the gap between the chaos of conflict regions around the world and the comfortable living rooms of his Western audience. As he covered wars in Liberia, Afghanistan, Darfur, Chad and Sri Lanka as well as Libya, his photography was characterised by a remarkable human sensitivity and an eye for the beautiful and strange.

Read the rest of this obituary from The Telegraph

See Tim Hetherington’s work here

Tim Hetherington: A Vanity Fair Portfolio