Oxford School of Photography

insights into photography

Tag Archives: Techniques and Styles

20 Expressive Negative Space Photography – Negative is Positive

This article from a graphic design website explains how the use of negative space within an image can make a positive expression. We cover these subject areas in our Composition Course – Seeing Pictures

“There are several things that graphic designers can learn from other professions. Photography is one such field that shares similar techniques with graphic design. Minimalism and clarity of work are both common traits of graphic designing and photography. Likewise, one of the best tricks of incorporating minimalism in an artwork is using negative space.

Negative space is the space around an object of attention. Although some might argue that negative space is wasted space, the absence of content does not mean the absence of interest. On the contrary, negative space generates attention as it puts a stronger emphasis on the subject. It also helps in arousing the emotions of the object in focus.”  See more pictures and read more here

 

 

Abstract Photography: how to shoot urban Impressionism

The trend of Impressionist photography has shown us the natural world as it’s never been seen before. But can it work in an urban setting?

Photography has witnessed an explosion of creative ideas over the last few years, primarily due to the advent of digital capture and processing via the “dry” darkroom. The digital photography age, due to the low cost of memory as opposed to capture on film, has above all allowed the individual to experiment far beyond what was previously possible. It has also allowed people to develop new methods of approach to their photography, here, leading landscape photographers  Morag Paterson and Ted Leeming talk about how to transfer your Impressionist photography techniques from the natural world to the urban environment. Read more….

Architecture Photography: A Quick Guide to Shooting Building Exteriors

Following on from this post about The Taj Mahal this article is well presented with lots of ideas and techniques and considerations of what lenses you should use to achieve a special view.

Camera Sensor Cleaning Techniques

From those very clever people at Cambridge in Colour a useful tutorial on how to clean the sensor on your camera. You may be aware of spots appearing in areas of clear tone in your pictures, areas like blue sky, these are almost always caused by dust on the sensor. This in depth article explains how to resolve the issue and explains about use of brushes, blowers and other stuff.

“If you’re using an SLR camera, you’ll eventually encounter spots in your photos due to a dirty camera sensor. If it hasn’t happened yet, don’t worry — it will. When it does, you’ll need to know if what you’re seeing is indeed from sensor dust, or is instead the result of a dirty viewfinder, mirror or lens. Most importantly though, you’ll need to know how to clean the sensor, and how to minimize the risk of this happening again.”



Michael Kenna: Traces of the Past

Michael Kenna is sort of local to Oxford, having taught in Banbury so not quite a home town boy but  one of the most experienced black and white photographers still active. This really illuminating interview is worth your time.

“Michael Kenna’s beautiful black-and-white images have been described as haunting, minimalist and ethereal. And by his admission, he chooses to examine one or two elements in a scene, “instead of describing everything that’s going on.” His unique approach to the environment results in simple but powerful photos of architecture, landscapes and the sea.”


24 Blue Hour Photographs for Inspiration

From those nice people at LightStalking The blue hour is that beautiful period of time that isn’t quite day time and isn’t quite night time. The quality of light thrown off is an absolute gift for photographers who can really use that quality of light to produce special colors in photography. It’s had enough of an impact on the general public for at least on restaurant in every city to be called L’Heure Bleue too. This collection should show you why it’s such an inspiration to people.

Breathtaking Urban Decay Photographs

As a subject area dereliction is often appealing, there is something about grime and decay that draws many photographers’ eyes. This display offers some really interesting images that make you think, wish I had seen that, but at the same time might encourage you to go and seek such locations for yourself.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Breathtaking Urban Decay Photographs | CreativeFan.

55+ Great Photography Tutorials

From Tripwire

By following detailed photography tutorials you can learn new techniques and be inspired by experienced photographers.

Photography is a great passion for many people and the possibilities for creating stunning shots are endless with the right equipment and skills. Some photographers are exceptional at capturing time and situations forever. While a bit of luck and good timing is required, many technical elements need to be just right. In many cases it requires patience, planning and a good sense for details to capture the best photo. In addition, many photographers today use after processing in tools like Photoshop. I personally think that learning some image enhancement techniques is useful as well.

Since we have been presenting various showcases of photography styles over time, I thought it would be a great idea to share some useful tips, tricks and tutorials. The availability of free material online for learning various techniques of photography is impressive but it takes time to filter out the useful stuff. I made an attempt by collecting more than 55 great photography tutorials.

These are really good tutorials. Here are just a few to sample

Nightclub Photography –

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Nightclub-Photography

This Nightclub Photography useful guide on how taking photos in clubs and bars where the light is dim but you need to capture images using a fairly fast shutter speed. see more here

Focus Stacking

Creating-a-focus-Stacked-Vertical-Panorama-with-a-400mm-Lens-Tuts-premium_thumb

Creating-a-focus-Stacked,-Vertical-Panorama-with-a-400mm-Lens—Tuts-premium

This image is the result of a focus stacking technique. It could not be done in a single shot. Read the tutorial here

5 Second Eye Enhancement – MORE INFO

5-Second-Eye-Enhancement[3]

Here’s a super-simple technique for enhancing the most important bits of any portrait: the eyes. It’s a quick and painless way to make the eyes really stand out and take on a slightly sultry and burning look.

Photographing Wild Birds In Civilized Places – MORE INFO

Photographing-Wild-Birds-In-Civilized-Places

This Eagle-Owl portrait was shot with a 400mm lens when the bird looked in my direction.

How To Capture Stunning Fine Art Landscape Photographs – MORE INFO

How-To-Capture-Stunning-Fine-Art-Landscape-Photographs[3]

The man in this photo is working to extract salt from the Salinas Grande’s, a large salt pan in north-west Argentina. The photo shows the relationship between the man and the otherworldly landscape that he works in.

Street Photography Explained – MORE INFO

Street-Photography-Explained

Street photography is one of those techniques that sounds simple, ‘just go out and take some photos of people wondering about’.

See more of these tutorials here

Photography Courses for 2014

We have our new schedule for the coming year, we are currently writing a couple of new courses, one on art photography, but these will not be ready for the new term. We have all the usual favourites from Understanding Your Digital SLR Camera, Composition In Photography, Portraiture, Flash, Lightroom, Photoshop,

you can see the full list here

Understanding Your DSLR Camera Evening Class £85 Start Dates: 21.01.2014;  05.03.2014

Understanding Your DSLR Camera Saturday Morning Class £85 Start Date: 9.11.2013;   08.03.2014

1 Day Understanding Your DSLR Camera £95 Dates, 27.10.2013; 26.01.2014; 23.02.2014; 30.03.2014; 27.04.2014

Understanding Your Digital Compact Camera £85 Start Date: 5.03.2014

Intermediate Photography £97 Start Date: 24.02.2014

Flash Photography £85 Start date 29.01.2014

Understanding Lightroom £85 Start Date: 27.02.2014

Introduction to Photoshop and PS Elements £97 Start Date: 18.02.2014

Composition In Photography – Seeing Pictures £85 Start Date: 4.03.2014

Portrait Photography £85 Start Date: 27.01.2014

Laos

L1GHTB1TES a blog worth checking out

I was contacted today by György László who wanted to tell me about his blog and having had a chat with György and had a look at his site I thought I just had to share it with you.

As he said to me his blog is a weekly photography blog that I started about three months ago. Every week I select a picture that I like (mostly street/documentary/portrait photography), sometimes from famous authors, sometimes from young photographers. And I talk to the author about the picture: both about the craft side (camera, lens, settings, etc.) and about the artistic side of those decisions. His choice of photographers and images to discuss is interesting and the interviews can be revealing. If you are interested in photography, and if you are reading this you must be, I would recommend you check out his site, it is very nice looking too

Bruno_Bourel_Lovers

BRUNO BOUREL

Melting-Point-New-York-City-2003

JEFF JACOBSON

Erica_McDonald_window

ERICA MCDONALD

Here is a sample of the interview with Erica

GL: How did you ‘meet’ the woman behind the window?

EMD: It happened close to the end of the time when I was working on The Dark Light of This Nothing. I had the bones of the series laid down but was out looking for the kinds of moments I had missed in the previous months. The woman just happened to be looking out her window – we saw each other and shared a moment.

The Dark Light was done as personal project. Up until that point I had been focused on the single image, and I had decided that I’d like to invest myself in a long-term story. Magnum photographer David Alan Harvey runs a site called Burn and he had been encouraging a group of readers to see what they could accomplish over a period of a month or so. I met with David and told him about a few of my ideas, and together we came to the conclusion that I should focus on this one; what was started as a month-long project became a several-year endeavor.

See more of this interview and read the others here