Oxford School of Photography

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Tag Archives: Tate

Nan Goldin Photographer

Rather surprisingly our most successful post ever has been about Nan Goldin, a photographer of great merit but who probably divides opinions. This from the Tate website gives an artist biography and has images.

“American photographer. Goldin began taking photographs as a teenager in Boston, MA. Her earliest works, black-and-white images of drag queens, were celebrations of the subcultural lifestyle of the community to which she belonged. During a period of study at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, she began displaying her work in the format of a slide-show, a constantly evolving project that acquired the title (appropriated from The Threepenny Opera by Kurt Weill and Bertolt Brecht) The Ballad of Sexual Dependency in 1981. This collection of images had a loose thematic structure and was usually shown with an accompanying sound-track, first in the clubs where many of the images were taken and then within gallery spaces. In the 1990s Goldin continued to produce portraits of drag queens, but also made images of friends who were dying of AIDS and recorded her experiences travelling in Asia…”.….MORE

Misty and Jimmy Paulette in a taxi, NYC 1991

© Nan Goldin, courtesy Matthew Marks Gallery, New York

Nan one month after being battered 1984 Nan Goldin

© Nan Goldin, courtesy Matthew Marks Gallery, New York

Greer and Robert on the bed, NYC 1982

© Nan Goldin, courtesy Matthew Marks Gallery, New York

There is a very interesting interview in The Guardian

‘My camera has saved my life’

From New York’s druggy nightlife to her parents ‘making out’, Nan Goldin chronicles the real and the raw. She talks to Angelique Chrisafis about art, pornography and tabloid critics

“Nan Goldin leads me into the bedroom of her Paris apartment, fluffs up a pillow and settles down on her bed, lighting a cigarette. Her pink dressing gown hangs over the door of her wardrobe; there are black and white stills on the wall. It’s fitting that the legendary photographer should want us to talk in her bedroom, side by side on the patterned bedspread: long before Tracey Emin’s unmade chaos, Goldin specialised in the silences of rumpled sheets. Since the early 1970s, she has shot herself and friends in bed – having sex, sleeping, arguing and, after Aids struck, dying. She curled up with her boyfriend Brian, and later shot a bruised self-portrait after he hit her.”.…MORE

Here are some links for further study

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nan_Goldin

http://www.matthewmarks.com/artists/nan-goldin/

http://www.artnet.com/artists/nan-goldin/

http://www.moma.org/collection/artist.php?artist_id=7532

and here is a link to our original post

Tate’s national photographic archive ‘rescued from skip’ after internal tipoff

reports in The Guardian today

“An art charity saved the crucial collection after employee’s call, but another archive was dumped by the V&A”

Tate photographic collection

The Tate’s discarded archive, now stored on these shelves, contained photos of art from its collections and beyond, such as these images of two John Hoppner works. Photograph: Graeme Robertson for the Guardian

“Art historians have been disturbed by allegations that the Tate was about to dump its invaluable photographic archive in a skip when another institution realised its importance and rescued it, and that the Victoria & Albert Museum has already destroyed its own thematic archive. Curators, who consider such resources vital, were not consulted.

The archives were full of photographs of artworks from their collections and beyond – crucial visual histories, invaluable for comparative research and for studying any deterioration as a result of time or restoration.”.…MORE

Britain’s photographic revolution

Fascinating article in the Guardian/Observer by at the weekend regarding the state of photography as considered as art in Britain. O’Hagen is one of the most impressive writers on photography in Britain and the article absolutely to the point.

“The big art institutions here are finally catching up with their American counterparts, with a new photography gallery at the V&A, increased prominence at the Tate and exciting plans elsewhere. We asked four leading curators about the state of the art……..The September issue of the art magazine Frieze ran a glossary of “keywords” in contemporary art and culture. Under “Photography” the compilers wrote: “The first photograph was produced in 1826. In 2009 Tate advertised the following job for the first time: Curator (Photography and International Art). Discuss.” The question invited was: why had it taken so long for photography to be viewed as a serious art form in Britain? The Museum of Modern Art in New York, for instance, appointed its first curator of photography, Beaumont Newhall, in 1940.”.………….more

 

Snap happy: leading curators (l-r) Martin Barnes (V&A), Brett Rogers (Photographers’ Gallery), Simon Baker (Tate Modern) and Charlotte Cotton (the Media Space). Portrait by Suki Dhanda for Observer New Review