Oxford School of Photography

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Tag Archives: Royal Academy

Pictures of the week from The Denver Post

Another set of magnificent images from The Denver Post, as I keep saying book mark their website and get a daily feed of breathtaking images....see all the images here

Mist and fog rolls across agricultural fields as the sun rises over the Somerset Levels on January 13, 2012 in Glastonbury, England. After unseasonably mild weather, many parts of the UK were waking up to the first frost of the year. Weather forecasters have warned that there will be more hard frosts and freezing fog this weekend and temperatures will plunge across the country. Although the cold spell is only expected to last until Tuesday, the Met Office is also warning of a ‘risk of colder conditions’ at the beginning of February. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

This Jan. 17, 2012 satellite image provided by DigitalGlobe shows the luxury cruise ship Costa Concordia, which ran aground on Friday, Jan. 13, lying on its starboard side just off the tiny Tuscan island of Isola del Giglio, Italy. As the ship keeps shifting on its rocky ledge, many have raised the prospect of a possible environmental disaster if the 2,300 tonnes of fuel on the half-submerged cruise ship leaks. Satellites are used to monitor the area while authorities are preparing to remove the fuel from inside the vessel. (AP Photo/DigitalGlobe)

A model showcases designs on the runway by Qi Gang during the ‘Hong Kong Fashion Extravaganza’ show on day one of Hong Kong Fashion Week Autumn/Winter 2012 at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Center on January 16, 2012 in Hong Kong, Hong Kong. (Photo by Victor Fraile/Getty Images)

British artist David Hockney takes a picture of press photographers with his mobile phone as he poses in front of his painting entitled “The Arrival of Spring in Woldgate, East Yorkshire 2011 (twenty-eleven)” at the opening of his exhibition David Hockney RA: A Bigger Picture in the Royal Academy of Arts on January 16, 2012 in London, England. The exhibition is the first major showcase of David Hockney’s landscape work to be held in the UK. (Photo by Oli Scarff/Getty Images)

Hindu devotee holds an oil lamp and offers prayers to the Sun god at the Sangam, the confluence of the rivers Ganges, Yamuna and the mythical Saraswati, on Makar Sankranti festival, that falls during the annual traditional fair of Magh Mela, in Allahabad, India, Saturday, Jan. 14, 2012. Hundreds of thousands of devout Hindus take a bath at the confluence during the astronomically auspicious period of over 45 days celebrated as “Magh Mela” to rid themselves of their sins and attain prosperity. (AP Photo/Rajesh Kumar Singh)

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Eyewitness: Hungarian Photography in the 20th Century – 30 June—2 October 2011

Everyone who has seen this has reported back that it is an excellent and unmissable exhibition.

Brassaï, Robert Capa, André Kertész, László Moholy-Nagy and Martin Munkácsi each left Hungary to make their names in Germany, France and the USA, and are now known for the profound changes they brought about in photojournalism, as well as abstract, fashion and art photography. At The RA London

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Eyewitness: Hungarian Photography in the 20th Century – review

Another reason for visiting London this summer is the exhibition of Hungarian photography at the Royal Academy, here is a review of the exhibition from the Guardian/Observer by

Eyewitness: Hungarian Photography in the 20th Century explores the legacy of innovative Hungarian photographers from Brassaï to Robert Capa – pioneers of photojournalism, fashion photography and surrealism. At the Royal Academy of Arts, London, until 2 October

“Eyewitness, the Royal Academy’s first foray into photography in almost a generation, turns out to have been worth the wait. The show is a revelation from beginning to end. It presents nothing less than the dark and convulsive story of Hungary during the 20th century as experienced by its citizens, and viewed by its artists, who happen to include five of the world’s greatest photographers – Brassaï, Capa, Kertész, Moholy-Nagy and Munkácsi.

Nobody could fail to be struck by that fact, in room after room of famous images. That they were all Hungarians may even come as news. Each was Jewish and each changed his name at some stage, either at home or in exile. Brassaï (born Gyula Halász), who was badly wounded fighting for Hungary in the first world war and nearly died of typhoid as a prisoner of the Romanians, left for Paris in 1924. His images of its streets and bars in rain and fog, and especially in the low glow of night, inflect our whole sense of that city.”.…more

Wedding, Budapest, 1965 by László Fejes, which, with its depiction of bullet holes in the wall, led to Fejes being banned from publishing his photographs. Photograph: Hungarian Museum of Photography

Martin Munkácsi, Four Boys at Lake Tanganyika, c 1930
Ernö Vadas, Procession, Budapest, 1934 Photograph: Hungarian Museum of Photography