Oxford School of Photography

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Tag Archives: Post-production

A Rough Guide to Adobe Camera Raw

Shooting in RAW and having to spend time processing your images might seem a bore when your camera produces perfectly nice jpegs as you press the shutter release however most serious photographers only shoot in RAW. This is because of the extensive image adjustments you can make to colour and density without producing ugly damaged looking images. Shooting RAW and using Adobe camera RAW found in the various versions of Photoshop and as the backbone of Lightroom has distinct advantages in the range of adjustments but also the plug ins and controls on offer.

On the pages of Lightstalking    gives a basic breakdown of the important options available

“Although many of us now use image management programs to process our Raw files, Adobe’s Camera Raw is still one of the most comprehensive convertors around and benefits from being tightly integrated into Photoshop and Photoshop Elements. One bonus of this, is that its user interface will be very familiar to Photoshop users. In this brief guide, we will give a rundown of ACR’s interface and most important features.

ACR Overall
ACR’s Main Screen

When you open a Raw file in Photoshop, the program will automatically open the ACR plugin and preview the image in a large window. Surrounding this window are the important tools you need for your Raw conversion. Running along the top of the preview window are a set of image manipulation tools, in essence, very similar to Photoshop’s own tool palette.”

Adobe Camera RAW for Beginners: Basic Adjustments

Last night when teaching the first class of our Photoshop course I was asked about RAW processing. This is not something we cover on this course but I am writing a course on Lightroom at the moment however whilst over at Photo Tuts I found this tutorial. RAW processing is not difficult to understand, it might take a while to fully get to grips with all the permutations, and this tutorial will get you started if you have never tried. Go here for the link to the Photo Tuts RAW processing tutorial

 

Create a Stunning High Key Portrait Photo

When I am looking for interesting tutorials I often head over to the Photo Tuts site which is crammed with good stuff. High key is a regular favourite subject area and this tutorial in a 30 minute video is pretty good at explaining how to achieve those washed out high contrast effects. Personally I prefer to read tutorials rather than watch videos but these days everyone want to be on tv, shame. Go here for this excellent tutorial

18 Effective Duotone Portraits

By definition, Wikipedia describes duotone as:

a halftone reproduction of an image using the superimposition of one contrasting color halftone (traditionally black) over another color halftone. This is most often used to bring out middle tones and highlights of an image. The most common colors used are blue, yellow, browns and reds.

 

we discuss this process and look at ways of doing it on our Black and White Digital course, the next starts 26th January


Duotone prints used to take a lot of time and skill to produce, and for many years they were not in among photographers or admirers of photography.  The last few years of digital photography combined with advancements in post production have given photographers the ability to create, simulate and replicate many traditional film processes, and duotone images are once again gaining popularity.  They are, as said above, most commonly seen in browns and blues, but reds and yellows do make an appearance.  This collection of duotone portraits shows how some creative post processing can really amplify and change the overall mood of a subject.     Read more: Light Stalking » 18 Effective Duotone Portraits