Oxford School of Photography

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Tag Archives: photographersworkshop.co.uk

Texture: The Secret Sauce of Atmospheric Photography

Knowing how to properly use texture in your images can make a profound difference to your photography. Composition, lighting, and tonal range are all important elements to consider…but by looking at the texture as well you can really ensure that the image you create is a true work of art……..more here Here’s a question for you…..why do photographers take long siestas in the middle of the day?


Storm Photography Tips (With 10 Stunning Examples)

Heading out to shoot a storm can be a great way to come back with some exceptional photographs. As you can see from the photographs below, storms often result in moody, dramatic and eye-popping images. But there are a lot of things to think about before you go out on a shoot like this, not all of them necessarily photography related. These are a few things you may want to consider. Read more

Architecture Photography: A Quick Guide to Shooting Building Exteriors

Following on from this post about The Taj Mahal this article is well presented with lots of ideas and techniques and considerations of what lenses you should use to achieve a special view.

Crop Factor Explained: How Sensor Size Affects the Field of View

From Lightstalking

These days, we often hear about the benefits of full frame cameras over APS-C, we are told about four thirds sensors and micro four thirds sensors but what does all this mean to us in relation to the way we take pictures? For this article, we are going to leave aside the differences in image quality such as noise and dynamic range because for most enthusiast photographers the difference is very minimal whatever the sensor.

The biggest difference is in what we call the crop factor of the sensor and to begin to understand that we are going to go back in time a little to the days of film.

For many of us that own or have owned a 35mm SLR film camera, the focal length of a lens seems pretty obvious. Focal lengths less than 35mm are wide angled, from 35-70 is considered a standard lens, as it is roughly similar to our own field of view and from 70mm upwards we are into the the telephoto ranges. The thing to keep in mind is that these are what we perceived to the fields of view on a 35mm camera.

The biggest myth to dispel when we come to digital sensors of less than full frame is that the crop factor magnifies the image. This is not true and perhaps the best way to explain it with the use of an image taken on a full frame camera.

Full Frame and APS-C Sensors: A Comparison

Let’s assume we have taken our shot on a 24mm lens on our full frame camera. We are now going to take exactly the same shot, with the same 24mm lens on an APS-C sensor camera. Most APS-C sensors have what is known as a 1.5X crop factor, and indeed when you take that same picture, it would appear that the image is indeed magnified, i.e. captured at a focal length of 24 x 1.5 =  36mm. However what we are going to do now is take our full frame image and crop into so that we get the same size as the output of an APS-C sensor. Now if you compare the cropped image to that of the the photo from the APS-C sensor, you will see that they are identical. The magnification is exactly the same but the image has a narrower field of view, in other words, compared to full frame, it is cropped.

APS-C is just Full Frame cropped by Jason Row Photography, on Flickr

 

So with this in mind, how does this relate to us in real life photography. Well let’s take a look at the most common forms of cameras that we enthusiasts use.  Go here for the rest of this excellent article

The Taj Mahal: 26 Images from Traditional to Unique

If you have ever had the opportunity to visit The Taj Mahal you will know that everywhere you point a camera there are pictures you want to take, and at the same time every picture you see has already been photographed by someone else. This can be frustrating, trying to find something new from one of the most photographed buildings in the world. But then you shoot anyway because whatever you capture is yours. Interestingly the towers on the corners are built leaning but look straight from a distance, at least that was what I was told by a guide, then again he could have been having a laugh at my ignorance. These pictures are not groundbreaking but are a good selection of what can be achieved from the obvious to the inventive. From those nice people at Light Stalking What these pictures prove is that a photographer requires patience and planning. Planning to be at the location when the light is just perfect and patience to wait.

Travel photography always acts as a great push for me, that saying “a photographer needs to see as a child or as a tourist….for the first time” is always easier in another country. Last year I went to Syria and here are some of my pictures, you may be interested, this year I am off to Libya to see Leptis Magna. If you doubt my reasons for Libya have a look at the pictures

7 Tips for Better Environmental Portraits

Shooting portraits can be one of the most fulfilling and frustrating jobs a photographer can take on.  Furthermore, portraits shot on location, that is to say, not in a studio with a background can be even more complicated based on what the client wants to portray. This tutorial from Light Stalking might be of help

Henry Janssen – de snackbar

make of these what you will, they are fun, more here by Henry Janssen

9 Crazy Cross Eye 3D Photography Images and How to Make Them

OK the headline makes it sound….well crazy, but the simple fact is that 3D is now part of our lives in some form or other and will increasingly be part of future viewing experiences, these images and tutorial make it a possibility for all of us to create 3D pictures, do you want to? That is a hard one to answer, if it adds to the image then I guess we would say yes but the reduction of a 3D world to 2D representation has been part of what we as photographers have done for over 150 years, but then we used film for most of that time. Change will come whether it is a good thing the future will tell us when it is too late. Stereoscopic images (3D) are not new, the first invention that allowed 3D imagery was in 1838

The photographer behind these images and tutorial is Neil Creek and this is what he starts with..

“A revolution in photography and videography is coming. The 50’s cliche of the 3D movie and nostalgic childhood 3D viewers like the Viewmaster were ideas ahead of their time. Pretty soon 3D will be everywhere. Thousands of US cinemasare being upgraded to show new 3D movies, new computer display technology is bringing 3D without glasses to the desktop, and a growing enthusiastic community is breathing new life into time-honored 3D photography techniques.

If you haven’t experimented with 3D photography yet, now’s the time.

Anyone with a camera can take 3D photos, and with a bit of practice, most people can learn to see the 3D effect on their monitors without special glasses. I’ve collected here a few examples of some of the cool stuff that photographers are doing with 3D photography today. I hope these images will entertain and inspire you to explore the third dimension in your photography, and put you ahead of the new wave of 3D imagery which will soon flood our culture.”

Master fill-in flash in 4 easy steps

Fill in flash is the thing that makes professionals able to work in even the harshest light, check out this very useful tutorial on Photoventure

This time of year, many photographers like to shoot outdoor portrait photography, but one of the challenges with this is coping with strong overhead sun and harsh shadows on your subject’s face.

Many a sunny-day portrait has been ruined by dark shadows creeping into the eyes and other facial areas, and fill-flash is good and very convenient solution.

On gloomy days, flash can be equally useful for warming up colour rendition and breathing life into skin tones. The trick is to balance the flash with daylight to obtain natural-looking exposures.

DSLRs and flashguns often make a good stab at this, even in Programme AE mode, but the results can vary. READ MORE HERE

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Best A3+ printer for photographers: 6 top models tested and rated

I have given up printing in the office or at home, the simple economics of it didn’t work out. The printers and paper were manageable but the cost of the inks, particularly when the printer wasn’t used continuously and so needed regular head cleaning, proved uneconomic. If you can justify regular use and enjoy the process this article will advise you as to the best printer to buy

Go large with your photo printing, right on your own desktop. We test 
six leading models to find the best A3 and A3+ printers for photographers.

InkjetPrinterRegular A4 photo printers are compact and convenient but, if you want a picture to frame and hang on the wall, the maximum size of their output leaves a lot to be desired.

By upgrading to an A3+ printer you can generate photo prints of up to 19×13 inches in size. A large print has much more wow factor, while you still have full control over the printing process and retain the relative immediacy of creating prints on your own desktop, without having to upload images and wait for photo prints to be delivered in the post.

Designs differ when it comes to large-format printers. Some use dye-based inks, which typically give the smoothest output on glossy paper.

Pigment-based inks are more robust and a better choice for matte media. Another consideration is whether you only want to make colour prints or if you’re also keen on top quality black-and-white photo output. READ MORE HERE