Oxford School of Photography

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Tag Archives: Photographers

Michael Kenna Exhibition at The Chris Beetles Gallery

 

The exhibitions at Chris Beetles Fine Photographs reflect the wide variety of genres and styles available in the photography market, and are always of the highest quality and from the finest sources. We hold up to 8 individual exhibitions per year, including our annual show ‘The Photographers’, which takes place every November and showcases the very best of the gallery’s stock, from rare vintage prints to modern limited-editions. Most shows are accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue containing biographies, essays, chronologies, bibliographies and extensive research.

Details here

One week left to enter BJP’s International Photography Award

There’s just one week left to enter British Journal of Photography’s International Photography Award, which offers photographers a chance to win a two-week exhibition at one of London’s best-respected contemporary galleries.

Chloe Dewe Mathews - a Panos Pictures photographer - has won this year's International Photography Award - run by British Journal of Photography - for her series Caspian

Chloe Dewe Mathews won the 2011 International Photography Award (series category) for a project called Caspian, which included this shot of two sisters running down to the underground mosque in Beket-Ata, Kazakhstan. Image © Chloe Dewe Mathews/Panos Pictures.

Brighton Biennial – Photography 2012

Two years ago the Brighton Biennial had some very strong photographic exhibitions during the month of the Biennial and I hope it will  so again. This year the dates are from the 6th October to the 7th November.

Under a title:

Agents of Change: Photography and the Politics of Space

Bringing international and emerging photographers and artists to the city, the fifth Brighton Photo Biennial explores the theme Agents of Change: Photography and the Politics of Space  with a packed programme of free exhibitions, new commissions, talks, screenings, workshops and masterclasses.

Four Versions of Three Routes

Preston is my Paris

An original body of work produced for BPB12 by the collective Preston is my Paris, directed by Adam Murray with photographers Jamie Hawkesworth, Robert Parkinson, Theo Simpson, and graphic designer Ben Mclaughlin. Four Versions of Three Routes explores possible constituency reformation in Brighton. Photographs taken and displayed along the debated constituency borders question how electoral districts are decided and how change might affect residents. Follow the routes to discover over 40 site-specific street posters. The routes can be found in a specially produced pamphlet available at all BPB12 venues…...MORE

© Jamie Hawkesworth

Urbex, the name given to Urban Explorers and the photographs they take is a very well appreciated genre, when we posted about it here and here they were some of our most popular articles so it is with interest that I see the Biennial has an exhibition of the work of these adventurers. I look forward to seeing the exhibition

Urban Exploration

Room (West of Brighton Bandstand)  153 King’s Rd, Brighton, The City of Brighton and Hove BN1

Bradley Garrett, Hanging from a Crane at the New Court building, City of London, 2010. © Bradley Garrett.

Taking nothing but photographs, leaving nothing but footprints, urban explorers around the world risk injury or arrest to infiltrate unseen or off-limits city spaces. They create astonishing images of abandoned buildings, construction sites  and underground tunnels. By photographing closed and hidden spaces and sharing those photos online, explorers bring these spaces to public view and add transparency to the urban make-up.

Housed in a repurposed shipping container, this exhibition presents a split-screen projection of hundreds of images  taken in cities around the globe.

There are many other exhibitions, talks, workshops and events and if it is as good as 2010 then it would be worth arranging a weekend by the sea on the south coast during October. Full details of the

Brighton Photo Biennial

6 October – 4 November 2012

Everything Was Moving: Photography from the 60s and 70s

The autumn is a great time for the arts, creative endeavour always finds it’s feet between September and November. In the summer we get the main players, blockbuster exhibitions, new albums by established artists and the big summer films but it is the autumn when things really matter.

This autumn there are a number of exhibitions hitting London and the first to bring to your attention is this show of documentary photography at The Barbican.

Phil Coomes on the BBC website has a review of the show, here is some of what he has to say

It could be argued the photography came of age in the swinging 60s. The men and women behind the cameras became household names and amateur photographers enjoyed access to affordable high quality cameras and film.

This photographic prosperity progressed into the next decade as photographers pushed the boundaries and began to explore new methods of working, and news photographers were able to document a world re-shaping itself at the height of the Cold War.

A new exhibition at the Barbican in London, Everything was Moving: Photography from the 60s and 70s explores the shifting political and social landscape of that time through the work of a number of photographers.

The exhibition is a must see for anyone remotely interested in documentary photography with large bodies of work from photographers like Bruce Davidson, David Goldblatt, Li Zhensheng, Ernest Cole and Raghubir Singh.  Read more from Phil here

Malick Sidibe, A Ye-ye posing,1963 (© Malick Sidibé. Courtesy Fifty One Fine Art Photography, Antwerp)

Raghubir Singh, Pilgrim and Ambassador, Prayag, Uttar Pradesh, 1977

Bruce Davidson, Black Americans, New York City. From the series New York (Life), 1961-65. (© Bruce Davidson / Magnum Photos)

The exhibition details are 13 September 2012 – 13 January 2013 Barbican Art Gallery

Further information can be found on the Barbican website here

 

British Wildlife Photography Awards 2012

Wildlife and photography seem to go hand in hand, so many people just love photographs of animals. Usually such awards are the preserve of the magnificent animals in far off places so this award is always a pleasure to consider as it is from our own doorsteps.

All the 2012 British Wildlife Photography Awards category winners and selected highly commended images are in these galleries.

The overall winning image by Dr Matt Doggett was his image entitled: “Gannet Jacuzzi”

Here are a couple more to whet your appetite

Fairy tale 1 by Alex Saberi

Beautiful Bluebells by Ian Wade

If you would like to see all of the winners the BWPA site is the place to go

If you just want a taste of the superlative images of wildlife from our shores then the BBC has a brief gallery here

Better by Design: The role of design in the making of five modern photobooks

It seems to me that if you are even only sort of interested in photography you should be making photobooks of your work. The problem is design; it  is something that doesn’t come easily to everyone. I marvel at my friend Andrew Esson, who is a book designer, he instinctively knows how to a design a book that looks impeccable. Then again he has designed books for the UN, Houses of Parliament, the Royal Palaces …. Anyway this article found in the BJP looks at some recent photobooks and discusses the merits of design.

Jörg Colberg focuses on an overlooked aspect of the photobook, discussing the role of design in the making of five modern classics.

In the most basic terms, they are simply books made up of photographs, but of course there’s much more to the photobook than that. Typically they are carefully edited and sequenced, and the selection of the photographs, and their order, are crucial to whatever story is being told. But there’s another crucial element that’s too often ignored – the design.

Over the past few decades, photobook design has become an integral part of telling the story. Classics such as Walker Evans’ American Photographs used a very straightforward design: blank pages and picture pages alternating with very little text, if any. In contrast, contemporary photobooks have come to embrace the many different ways in which the design of a book – the graphic design as well as its actual physical properties – can help shape the message. The following books are some of the most striking examples I have come across. Interested? Read More Here

Broken Manual by Alec Soth.

Travel Photographer of the Year Competition

The BJP reminds us that the TPOY competition is coming to a close for entries so no time to waste.

Laos 2011 ©Keith Barnes

Photographers have until 17 September to enter the 2012 edition of the Travel Photographer of the Year competition, which is open to amateur and professional photographers from all countries.

The overall winner will receive a £2500 cash prize, as well as another £2500 in an expenses paid international photography commission.

Photographers can enter their work in three portfolio categories – People Watching, Wild Planet, and Journeys; and two single shot categories – Water and Big City. Videographers can submit their HD videos in the Travel Shorts category.

The winners will be selected by a panel of jurors that include Eamonn McCabe, Jason Hawkes, Ami Vitale, Steve Bloom, Nick Meers and Chris Weston, and will see their work exhibited at the Royal Geographical Society in London.

Entry costs from £10 to £20 depending on the categories.

For more details, visit www.tpoty.com.

Pinhole Photography Competition

We have been asked to help publicise this competition, I can’t help thinking that demanding prints will be a problem but hey. what do I know.

The competition is organized by Trójmiejska Szkoła Fotografii TSF operated by TSF-Trójmiejskie Studio Fotografii Radosław Brzozowski.
The competition is open to all photographers. The photographs entered must be taken with a pinhole camera. Entries will only be accepted as prints. The minimal size for entries is 13x18cm. In case of entries printed in square format the minimum size is 13x13cm. In case of entries with non-standard proportions the longer side must not exceed 50cm. The application form can be downloaded from the organizer’s webpage
www.tsf.edu.pl as well as from the main sponsor’s webpage www.szlachetnafotografia.com . Competition entries should be sent to:
TSF Trójmiejska Szkoła Fotografii Al. Niepodległości 792/6 81-805 Sopot Poland
Marked ‘PINHOLE’ on the envelope.

How Art History Can Improve Your Photography

I like Lighstalking because they often have articles that are not just equipment or the obvious how to type tutorials. This piece By is a perfect example of that and one which I wholeheartedly agree with. There is no doubt that we can all learn from the masters of photography but why stop there, image making has been with us since almost the birth of mankind, think of the cave painting is Lascaux. So this article lays out the importance of art in general to photographers. I am always surprised when someone tells me they are interested in photography or more, that it is their hobby, but show no evidence of this other than owning a camera. What about exhibitions, master photographers or monographs or books about photography?

During some part of your training as a photographer, whether self taught or classically trained, you’ve probably been told to study images taken by photographers whose work you admire. You can learn a lot about your personal style this way, zeroing in on what it is exactly that makes you favor it. Discovery, after all, begins with observation. Keeping that in mind, let’s take our artistic observations one step further and we can see how the old masters of painting have influenced not the just the eyes of master photographers, but also the entire artistic medium that is photography.

There is no doubt about it, painting has had a significant impact on the way that photographers use light. The first thing that comes to mind is Rembrandt lighting. The style was named in honor of the painter and is still widely used in portrait photography for the simple fact that, when done correctly, it looks really good.

Vermeer – The Milkmaid [Public domain], by Johannes Vermeer (1632–1675)

How to Get Your Photographs Accepted at Stock Libraries

From Lightstalking By comes this very useful article to help you get your images accepted by picture libraries.

These days more and more people are considering selling their images via stock libraries. However some people find initially getting into a library be it macro stock like Alamy or micro stock such as iStockphoto a hugely frustrating ordeal. You prepare and send your very best images time after time and keep receiving the dreaded submission failed email. Today we have a look at how to prepare images for stock so that your submission is accepted.

Shoot What’s Needed!

Perhaps one of the biggest mistakes, would be stock photographers make, is sending their best images. This statement is not as daft as it sounds, the simple fact is, your best images may not be what the library is looking for. What you actually need to be sending is images the library needs. Working out what this is can be tricky, but you will often find that stock agencies publish a list of required images, failing that, fire off an email to the curator asking if there is a particular area where they require more images.

How to Prepare Your Photographs for Submission

Once you have established what the library is looking for and found suitable images to send, it is time to prepare them for uploading……………..MORE