Oxford School of Photography

insights into photography

Tag Archives: Photographers’ Gallery

GREGORY CREWDSON: CATHEDRAL OF THE PINES

I find I can rely upon the culture section of The Guardian for many interesting articles about photography. If you have been on my courses you will have found that I talk about Gregory Crewdson, his images are cinematic in many aspects, both the nature of their creation and the sense they provoke. He has a new exhibition called Cathedral of The Pines and it is reviewed in the The Guardian

2797

‘They were more difficult because they were less spectacular’ … Father and Son, 2013. Photograph: © Gregory Crewdson / Courtesy Gagosian Gallery

In 2013, in retreat from “a difficult divorce”, Gregory Crewdson moved from Manhattan to a converted church in rural Massachusetts. “I had to relocate myself, physically and psychologically,” says the photographer. So he spent his time mountain trekking, long-distance swimming and, when the winter set in, cross-country skiing.

“I was out in the snow one day when I came upon a sign for a section of the Appalachian Trail called Cathedral of the Pines,” he adds. “It stopped me in my tracks, just the resonance of the name. I knew I had to use it.”

The resulting series is more sombre, foreboding and inward-looking than the meticulously staged cinematic photographs that made his name. It opens this week at the Photographers’ Gallery in London, the first time the institution has devoted all its gallery space to a single artist.

Cathedral of the Pines took two and a half years to shoot and, typically for Crewdson, required the kind of preparation that usually attends a Hollywood film: months of casting, location hunting and storyboarding, with an extensive crew to oversee lighting, props, wardrobe, makeup and even some special effects involving artificial smoke and mist.

The new exhibition can be seen from the 23rd at The Photographers Gallery

03738f4167c986129981668ad9aa26a0

Gregory Crewdson The Haircut, 2014 Digital pigment print Image size: 37 1/2 × 50 inches (95.3 × 127 cm) Edition of 3 + 2 APs © Gregory Crewdson

“By my standards, it was relatively restrained,” he says, laughing and citing his 2008 series Beneath the Roses, which cost as much as a mid-budget movie and entailed four city streets being closed down for shots that required rain and snow-making machines.

959727fa48ac008413ac62008aed673b

Gregory Crewdson The Motel, 2014 Digital pigment print Image size: 37 1/2 × 50 inches (95.3 × 127 cm) Edition of 3 + 2 APs © Gregory Crewdson

Cathedral of the Pines was challenging in a different way. “These pictures are smaller in scale and, to a degree, they were more difficult because they were less spectacular. You have to create meaning and atmosphere in a more intimate way, which makes lighting, for instance, a lot more challenging.”

3000

Foreboding … Mother and Daughter, 2014 Photograph: © Gregory Crewdson / Courtesy Gagosian Gallery

see more pictures and read the rest of the review in the Guardian here

find out about the exhibition at the Photographers Gallery here

Advertisements

Saul Leiter – Photographers Gallery Exhibition

If you have been on one of our courses we would have probably introduced you to Saul Leiter because we love his photographs. The Photographers Gallery in London has an exhibition of his work from 22 Jan – 3 Apr 2016. Now you can see his work as it should be seen, on the wall.

Saul Leiter

003-Photographer-Saul-Leiter

Saul Leiter: Red Umbrella, ca. 1958 © Saul Leiter, Courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York. Aus der Ausstellung "Saul Leiter-Retrospektive", Deichtorhallen Hamburg 3.2.-15.4.2012.

030-saul-leiter-photography-the-red-list

641023501698eca403433a0af28924ce

saul-leiter-featured

saul-leiter

It’s only recently that Saul Leiter (1923-2013) has received due recognition for his pioneering role in the emergence of colour photography. He moved to New York intent on becoming a painter, yet ended up working for magazines such as Harper’s Bazaar, Elle andBritish Vogue and became known for his impressionistic colour street scenes.

As early as 1946, and thus well before representatives of the 1970s new colour photography school (such as William Eggleston and Stephen Shore), Leiter was using Kodachrome colour slide film for his free artistic shots, despite it being despised by artists of the day.

“When we do not know why the photographer has taken a picture and when we do not know why we are looking at it, all of a sudden we discover something that we start seeing. I like this confusion.” Saul Leiter

Photographers Gallery 

16–18 Ramillies Street, London W1F 7LW

Mon – Fri: 10.00 – 18.00
Thu: 10.00 – 20.00 during exhibitions
Sat: 10.00 – 18.00
Sun: 11.00 – 18.00

Bill Armstrong photographs from the infinity series

I came across Bill Armstrong in a round about way that doesn’t warrant explaining but it does highlight that there is so much more out there than we can ever know. His work is all about colour, almost nothing else, although there are things going on in his pictures it is the colour that makes the difference.

His work definitely falls into the bracket of

“One photo out of focus is a mistake, ten photos out of focus are an experimentation, one hundred photo out of focus are a style.”

 

BillArmstrongFilmNoir1433

 

BillArmstrongFilmNoir1405

this is what he says about The Infinity Series

My unique process of appropriating images and subjecting them to a series of manipulations—photocopying, cutting, painting, re-photographing—transforms the originals and gives them a new meaning in a new context.  Extreme blurring makes the edges within the collages disappear, so the photographs appear to be seamless, integrated images. This sleight of hand allows me to conjure a mysterious tromp l’oeil world that hovers between the real and the fantastic. It is a world just beyond our grasp, where place may be suggested, but is never defined, and where the identity of the amorphous figures remains in question.  It is a world that might exist in memory, in dreams, or, perhaps, in a parallel universe yet unvisited. 

The nature of visual perception intrigues me: how the eye continually tries to resolve these images, but is unable to do so, and how that is unsettling.  And I am drawn to the idea that we can believe something is real, while at the same time knowing it is illusory; that the experience of visual confusion, when the psyche is momentarily derailed, is what frees us to respond emotionally. 

At the same time, the subject of these collages is color.  Extreme de-focusing enables me to blend and distill hues, creating rhapsodies of color that are meditative pieces—glimpses into a space of pure color, beyond our focus, beyond our ken.

BillArmstrongFilmNoir1432

BillArmstrongFilmNoir1401

You will have either hated or loved these images, I doubt there is a halfway house, as a photographer you either want pictures to represent things, objects, moments in time or you want your pictures to hint at atmosphere, emotion and thoughts.

Bill Armstrong is running a workshop at The Photographers Gallery on 25th April, here is a link to the rather sparse information

 

Hot shots: FreshFaced and WildEyed photography – in pictures

From dog gymkhanas to Tahrir Square protesters, a major exhibition in London showcases the best rising talent in the field of photography every year – and here’s the pick of the bunch

For more, visit the Photographers’ Gallery until 21 July 2013

Nicolas Feldmeyer, After All, 2012

Nicolas Feldmeyer: After All, 2012Photograph:

Lorna Evans

 

Lorna Evans: Dog Jumping, 2012

Daniel Mayrit

Daniel Mayrit: An Encounter, 2012

Jolanta Dolewska, Holding, 2012

Jolanta Dolewska: Holding, 2012

See more here

Deutsche Börse photography prize 2013

It is probably fair to say that amongst photographers I know this prize is the most controversial. The photographers shortlisted almost always reflect the edges of photography where camera skills and traditional subject matter are of little importance. For example one of the short listed artists, Mishka Henner,  for the prize this year presents pictures from the google street view car cameras where he has selected views that include street sex workers.

_5__Press_Image_I_DBPP_13_I_Mishka_Henner_I__Carretera_de_Olot__Crespi_a____CT__Spain__2011_516fe01638d1f

Mishka Henner, Carretera de Fortuna, Murcia, Spain, 2012

Another, Cristina de Middel, who reimagines the 60s space programme in Zambia. I know it barely warrants thinking about

_1__Press_Image_I_DBPP_2013_I_Cristina_de_Middel_I_The_Afronauts_2012_516fec647c340_5__Press_Image_l_DBPP_2013_l_Cristina_de_Middel_l_The_Afronauts_2012_516fed1e78799

Cristina De Middel, The Afronauts, 2012

Chris Killip is probably the only name you might recognise and the only one on the shortlist that makes photographs like a photographer.

_1__Press_Image_I_DBPP_2013_I_Chris_Killip_I_Youth_on_Wall__Jarrow__Tyneside__1976_516fe7c7c8a17

Chris Killip, Youth on Wall, Jarrow, Tyneside, 1976

Chris Killip (b. 1946, UK) is nominated for his exhibition What Happened – Great Britain 1970 –1990 at LE BAL, Paris (12 May – 19 August 2012).

British born Killip has been taking photographs for nearly five decades.What Happened – Great Britain comprises black and white images of working people in the north of England, taken by Killip in the 1970s and 1980s. After spending months immersed in several communities, Killip documented the disintegration of the industrial past with a poetic and highly personal point of view.

The final artists shortlisted for this prize are

Adam Broomberg (b. 1970, South Africa) and Oliver Chanarin (b. 1971, UK) are nominated for their publication War Primer 2 (MACK, 2012).

War Primer 2 is a limited edition book that physically inhabits the pages of Bertold Brecht’s remarkable 1955 publication War Primer. Brecht’s photo-essay comprises 85 images, photographic fragments or collected newspaper clippings, that were placed next to a four-line poem, called ‘photo-epigrams’. Broomberg and Chanarin layered Google search results for the poems over Brecht’s originals.

For full details of the  Deutsche Börse photography prize 2013 There is an exhibition at The Photographers Gallery and much more information here 

For a much more teeth grinding experience have a look at the video on the Guardian website  where the excellent Sean O’Hagen discusses the work with the photographers/artists involved. Sean O’Hagan meets the nominees for the annual Deutsche Börse photography prize: Mishka Henner, who puts Google Street View to imaginative use; Cristina de Middel, who reimagines the 60s space programme in Zambia; Chris Killip, who asks What Happened, Great Britain; and duo Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin, who have reworked a Bertolt Brecht book.

It is hard to tell if this prize and exhibition actually does good or bad for photography. Most people seeing the work of these four artists would recognise Chris Killip as a photographer but would struggle with the other three.

further reading on the Guardian website comes courtesy of 

A sociologist by training, Henner presents (or rather, re-presents) the images without comment. Henner annoys me. For other projects, he has digitally removed the figures from Robert Frank’s The Americans, and overlain Gerhard Richter’s blurry, photographically based paintings with words and phrases taken from Ed Ruscha’s work. Ho ho, you say. Real complexity lies elsewhere……….It was never going to get off the ground. De Middel’s photographs, drawings and re-photographed letters conflate original material with her own reconstructions and fantasy. A space camp shelters under a boabab tree; cosmonauts wander through a village of straw huts; a man in a wax-batik patterned spacesuit struggles through a cane field. Yinka Shonibare has presented a family of astronauts in similar garb floating in mid-air. What goes around comes around. All this works better in the little self-published book De Middel made of her project – now out of print and selling, I am told, for more than £1,000.

can you be bothered to learn more about these three artists and one photographer if so go here

What do you think?

Brian Griffin on Corporate Photography Thursday 7th August

The Social is back at The Photographers’ Gallery on Thursday, and this time we’re proud to have Brian Griffin speaking on corporate photography……

From Eurostar to Rekyjavik Energy, Brian Griffin has shot some of the biggest and best corporate commissions in the business. So who better to talk through corporate photography at The Social this Thursday? BJP and The Photographers’ Gallery are proud to announce that Brian will be joining us to talk through his experiences in this field and discuss how to get creative within this underrated area.

Also joining us will be photographer Brijesh Patel and project manager Franck Jehanne, who founded the Kalory Agency last year to specialise in creating photography and marketing content for the luxury, fashion and beauty industries. Now a team of eight people, Kalory has picked up lucrative contracts with Jaeger, Cartier, Vacheron Constantin and Mikimoto.

The Social is run by The Photographers’ Gallery and the British Journal of Photography, and takes places once a quarter at The Photographers’ Gallery, 16-18 Ramillies Street, London W1F 7LW from 7pm-9pm. The Corporate Photography special will take place this Thursday, 07 August.

The Photographers Gallery Events and Talks

From the Guardian’s Best Shot Series we have this from Brian Griffin

Four years ago, I was doing a big project in Iceland. It meant travelling all round, and at one point I went to the small town of Höfn, in the southeast corner. It has 1,500 people, one bar, one hotel. It’s like the end of the world – there’s nothing there. It looked like the most difficult place on earth to take pictures. So I decided to spend a month there, to see what I could do, even though this was before the crunch and Iceland was frighteningly expensive.

In May 2007, I housed myself in Höfn’s hotel. In that month, no one there made any attempt to even talk to me. No one bought me a drink, or invited me for a meal. I spent every single day on my own, except for the times when my wife Brynja, who’s from Iceland herself, came for a visit. As we drove around one day, I noticed this extraordinary-looking farmer.

While Brynja was asking if he’d mind being photographed, she spotted a newborn lamb and offered the farmer £350 to spare its life. She christened it Steinunn, a common woman’s name in Iceland. It struck me as the perfect way to shoot the farmer, so I brought out my lights. I shot in black-and-white on a Hasselblad. Looking at the sky, I think the rain was coming in. Iceland has extraordinary light quality: the cloud structure changes rapidly, the sunlight cascades through.

I didn’t have anything planned. It just occurred to me to ask him to lie down. I’m always looking for the unusual. There’s something spiritual about this picture: Christian iconography always seems to be hanging around in my work. “I want to make sure the lamb lives a complete life and won’t be slaughtered,” my wife told the farmer at one point. “You’re not going to kill it and eat it.” Brian Griffin

Deutsche Börse photography prize 2012 – in pictures

We have featured this prize before, now The Guardian shows the images again and provides a review by Adrian Searle

Pieter Hugo, Rinko Kawauchi, John Stezaker and Christopher Williams are the four photographers shortlisted for this year’s £30,000 Deutsche Börse photography prize. Their work goes on display at The Photographers’ Gallery from 13 July – 9 September 2012. View some of their images here

Adrian Searle: John Stezaker’s work is by miles the best here, with that great unteachable gift: an eye and a sensibility

John Stezaker, Siren Song V, 2011 Photograph: Courtesy of the artist and The Approach, London

Pieter Hugo, Yakubu Al Hasan, Agbogbloshie Market, Accra, Ghana, 2009 Photograph: Pieter Hugo/Courtesy of Stevenson Gallery, Cape Town and Yossi Milo Gallery, New York

Christopher Williams, Fachhochschule Aachen, Fachbereich Gestaltung, Studiengang: Visuelle Kommunikation, Fotolabor für Studenten, Boxgraben 100, Aachen, 8 November, 2010 Photograph: Christopher Williams/Courtesy Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne
Yeah I don’t get it either……

EXHIBITION OPPORTUNITY FOR RECENT GRADUATES – The Photographers Gallery

So the Photographers Gallery is open again and with a great series of exhibitions and projects, the new website looks good too and I love the new logo

One of this year’s projects is an exhibition for new photography graduates called

FreshFaced+WildEyed  which showcases the work of recent graduates from across the UK. Now in its fifth year, this annual event highlights the breadth and diversity of photographic practices emerging from UK institutions, giving graduates a public platform at a critical point in their careers.

Following an online application process, selected finalists have their work exhibited at The Photographers’ Gallery and online, and the opportunity to work with a mentor for twelve months.

THE EXHIBITION

At The Photographers’ Gallery, London, 15 – 30 September 2012, and online at ffwe.thephotographersgallery.org.uk

THE MENTORSHIP SCHEME
This year, for the first time, we are offering this scheme in addition to the exhibition opportunity. A number of mentorships will be awarded to finalists, who will be matched with a mentor whose professional/ creative background is relevant to their practice. The mentor and graduate will enter into a yearlong dialogue, offering participants invaluable feedback on their current work and the broader professional and critical context into which it fits.
APPLICATIONS
All applications must be submitted through this site by 18.00, Monday 2 July 2012

If you have any questions about this opportunity that cannot be answered by the information below,

please email karen.mcquaid@tpg.org.uk

Deutsche Börse Photography Prize 2012

13 July – 9 September 2012

The four artists shortlisted for the Deutsche Börse Photography Prize 2012 are Pieter Hugo, Rinko Kawauchi, John Stezaker and Christopher Williams.

This selection showcases diverse approaches to photography, from portraits taken in the toxic waste dumps of Ghana, to exquisite images of everyday moments and the conceptual use of found imagery.

Yakubu Al Hasan, Agbogbloshie Market, Accra, Ghana 2009 © Pieter Hugo

There is a program of courses and workshops, here is one on offer

A Brief History of British Photography

16 June – 14 July 2012

An introduction to some of the key movements, developments and figures in photography in Britain, from 1800s to the present day.

Led by Greg Jones

£88/£55

Booking through City Lit www.citylit.ac.uk

There is a lot more to check out on the web site so here is the link or even better go and have a look for yourself

The Photographers' Gallery
© Kate Elliott, Courtesy The Photographers’ Gallery

The Photographers’ Gallery is the largest public gallery in London dedicated to photography. From the latest emerging talent, to historical archives and established artists – we are the place to see photography in all its forms.

Open 7 Days, Admission Free

Monday – Saturday 10.00 – 18.00
Thursday 10.00 – 20.00
Sunday 11.30 – 18.00

The Cafe is open from 9.00 Monday – Friday

16 – 18 Ramillies Street, London W1F 7LW

Visit Journey Planner  or Street Map to plan your visit. Nearest tube Oxford Circus


The Photographers’ Gallery celebrates London 2012 Olympics with an outdoor exhibition

Simon Bainbridge writes in the BJP about an exhibition due to open at the new Photographers Gallery.

“The World in London is a major outdoor photography exhibition that will go on show in east London to coincide with the London 2012 Olympics.

The Photographers’ Gallery has revealed its contribution to this year’s Olympic games, announcing The World in London, a major outdoor exhibition for which it commissioned 204 portraits.Each of the 204 subjects originated from one of the 204 countries competing in this summer’s games in the capital, all of which will be shown together as large-scale posters in Victoria Park in east London (which hosts the 2012 Olympics), as well as in the pedestrian zone outside the gallery’s soon-to-re-open venue in Soho. “

The World in London explores portraiture and cultural diversity using photography, one of the most accessible and democratic artistic mediums of our times,” says the gallery. “The project celebrates London as a place where individuals from all parts of the world live side by side, each of them contributing to make London the unique city it is.”.…….MORE

Snezana Lukka-Biesek, Russia 2010 (c) Véronique Rolland, who is one of 204 photographers commissioned for an exhibition as part of the London 2012 Festival.

Read more: http://www.bjp-online.com/british-journal-of-photography/news/2165603/photographers-gallery-celebrates-london-2012-olympics-outdoor-exhibition-204-portraits#ixzz1rYEp2531
Subscribe to BJP and save money. Click here to save 29% today.

Deutsche Börse prize shortlist

The Deutsche Börse Photography Prize aims to reward a contemporary photographer of any nationality, who has made the most significant contribution (exhibition or publication) to the medium of photography in Europe in the previous year.

The Prize was originally set up in 1996 by The Photographers’ Gallery in London to promote the best of contemporary photography. Deutsche Börse has sponsored the £30,000 prize since 2005. The Prize showcases new talents and highlights the best of international photography practice. It is one of the most prestigious prizes in the world of photography. The Photographers’ Gallery and Deutsche Börse were shortlisted for Arts & Business International Award 2008 for their cooperation in the Deutsche Börse Photography Prize.

Deutsche Börse Photography Prize 2012

The four shortlisted artists for the Deutsche Börse Photography Prize 2012 are Pieter Hugo, Rinko Kawauchi, John Stezaker and Christopher Williams.

Work by the shortlisted photographers will be shown in an exhibition at The Photographers’ Gallery, Summer 2012, followed by its presentations at C/O Berlin, Forum for visual dialogs and at the Deutsche Börse headquarters in Frankfurt.

writing in The Guardian gives his view of the 4 shortlist photographers/artists or should that be artist/photographers?

“The 2012 Deutsche Börse photography prize shortlist is an intriguing one, not least because of the range of styles and subject matter broached by the four nominees. Interestingly, two of the photographers, Japan’s Rinko Kawauchi and South Africa’s Pieter Hugo, are nominated for work presented in book form, while both of the photographers nominated for their exhibitions, Britain’s John Stezaker and Christopher Williams from the US, are not photographers per se, but conceptual artists who use photography in their practice…………………..Decision time. The judges’ verdict seldom chimes with my wishful thinking – Jim Goldberg’s win, this year, was the exception to that rule – but, for the record, my heart says Kawauchi, but my head says Hugo. As is often the case with the Deutsche Börse prize, I may well be shaking my head in bemusement when the winner is announced next year.” read more here

Detail of Christopher Williams’s Bergische Bauernscheune, Junkersholz, Leichlingen, September 29th, 2009, 2010. Photograph: 1996-98 AccuSoft Inc

Detail of John Stezaker’s Marriage (Film Portrait Collage), XLIII, 2007. Photograph: Courtesy of the artist and The Approach, London

Rinko Kawauchi, Untitled, from Illuminance, 2009. Photograph: Rinko Kawauchi

Detail of Pieter Hugo’s Yakubu Al Hasan, Agbogbloshie Market, Accra, Ghana, 2009. Photograph: Pieter Hugo/Stevenson Gallery, Cape Town and Yossi Milo Gallery, New York