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Tag Archives: Leonid Brezhnev

Exploring Colonel Muammar Gaddafi’s photography archives

In the BJP this week there is an very interesting article by Olivier Laurent about photographic archives found in Libya after the fall of the tyrant Gaddafi. The images shown are effectively copies made by the photographers working for Human Rights watch who found them, this leads to a debate about the ownership of the images and the considerations of copyright, some comments arguing that the copying of images and crediting them to the copier feels a bit wrong because the original photographer has rights too. Anyway if you read the article you will be able to read the debate and  the comments and add to the discussion if you wish, this is how the article starts

Colonel Gaddafi in air force uniform at an Arab Summit in Tripoli, Libya December 02, 1977. Image © Courtesy of Michael Christopher Brown/Human Rights Watch.

For the past year, Human Rights Watch has been compiling documents and images found after the fall of Libya’s authoritarian regime in a bid to secure an important passage of the country’s history. Now a selection of these artefacts – named The Gaddafi Archives – is set to go on show at the London Festival of Photography. Olivier Laurent reports……

In the first months of last year, as Colonel Muammar Gaddafi’s stronghold on Libya slowly crumbled, staff from Human Rights Watch came upon hundreds of discarded documents, including images from the regime’s secret police’s archives, as well as the dictator’s own family albums. “When we arrived in Benghazi in February 2011, we found that many of these documents were being burned,” the NGO’s emergencies director Peter Bouckaert told BJP last year. “Almost all of them had been burned already,” he says, so it was a race against time.

“One day we were approached by a Libyan man who had rescued some images from the State Security Services buildings,” photographs that literally smelled of smoke, Bouckaert recalls. “They had been taken out of the building as it was being burned down by the rebels.” Mindful that his organisation could not remove the images from the country, Bouckaert set about documenting them with the help of photographers such as Thomas Dworzak, Michael Christopher Brown and the late Tim Hetherington. Now, eight months after the fall of Tripoli and Gaddafi’s death, a selection of these photographs, documents, artefacts and videos will go on show in the UK at the London Festival of Photography. Curated by Susan Glen, the exhibition aims “to look behind the ‘grip-and-grin’ smiles of the political photo-op propaganda to reveal what was really going on” in Libya, she says…….MORE

Colonel Gaddafi and Leonid Brezhnev, General Secretary of the Soviet Union, holding hands in Moscow, April 27th, 1981. Image © Courtesy of Michael Christopher Brown/Human Rights Watch.

For more information, visit www.hrw.org and www.lfph.org.

London Festival of Photography June 2012

In June 2012, London’s most celebrated venues (Museum of London, British Library, British Museum, Tate Modern, the V&A and more…) will play host to a world-class, city-wide celebration of photography as the London Festival of Photography returns for its second year.

Encompassing street, documentary and conceptual photography, the festival includes 18 exhibitions and 30 satellite events including workshops, talks and screenings.

Exhibitions will vary in style and format, presenting a comprehensive mixture of disciplines with work from both established and emerging photographers. Content will be curated around the theme, Inside Out: Reflections on the Public and the Private.

The festival opens to the public on 1 June 2012 (many exhibitions are open during the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee bank holiday weekend 2, 3, 4 & 5 June)

The Great British Public – Various

The New Forest and Hampshire County Show 2004 Photograph: Arnhel de Serra

Dates: 01 June to 24 June 2012
Venue: Dog Eared Gallery
Address: 25-28 Field Street, London, WC1 X9DA
Disabled Access: This event DOES NOT have wheelchair access
Map: View
Opening Times: 10am-6pm, 7 days per week. OPEN bank holidays 4 & 5 June.
Price: £6.50

Embracing the spirit of patriotism with the upcoming Olympics and the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee, this show will present images from photographers working the length and breadth of the British Isles documenting the daily life, work and rituals of the British in their many incarnations.mage © Nick Cunard

More about this exhibition here

The Gaddafi Archives – Libya Before the Arab Spring

Dates: 21 June to 29 June 2012
Venue: Slade Research Centre (The Warburg Institute – entrance to the left of the main entrance)
Address: Woburn Square, London, WC1H 0AB
Disabled Access: This event has wheelchair access
Map: View
Opening Times: 10am-10pm, 7 days per week
Price: £7.50 (£5 WITH AN OPEN CITY TICKET)

PLEASE NOTE NEW EXHIBITION DATES: Thur 21 to Fri 29 June – 9 days only*
Through carefully collated photographs, documents, artefacts and videos this exhibition will shed light on the recent history of Libya, starting with the reign of King Idris and spanning the regime of Colonel Gaddafi. The exhibition will highlight photography’s role in recording and documenting an important period in Libya’s history that we can only now begin to truly understand. Pictures and documents from state intelligence buildings and destroyed Gaddafi residences that were found by Human Rights Watch’s emergencies director Peter Bouckaert, and recorded and photographed at the sites, will be presented. All original materials were left where they were found after being photographed or have been since been returned to the National Transition Council in Libya.

This archive is unique and rare and contains over 1,000 images across a wide range of topics. King Idris is seen welcoming a young Queen Elizabeth II in 1954 on her second foreign trip as monarch, the early Gaddafi years vividly show a strong relationship between Colonel Gaddafi and his hero President Nasser of Egypt.

MORE about this exhibition here

Colonel Gaddafi and Leonid Brezhnev, General Secretary of the Soviet Union, holding hands in Moscow, April 27th, 1981. (c) 2011 Michael Christopher Brown for Human Rights Watch

Beneath the Surface – Steve Bloom

Dates: 01 June to 28 June 2012
Venue: Guardian Gallery (Kings Place)
Address: Guardian News & Media, Kings Place, 90 York Way, London, N1 9GU
Disabled Access: This event has wheelchair access
Map: View
Opening Times: 10am-6pm, 7 days per week. OPEN bank holidays 4 & 5 June.
Price: FREE

An exhibition of Steve Bloom’s photographs from the mid 1970’s, capturing a critical moment in the history of apartheid-era South Africa. Some of these images are being shown for the first time, while others have not been seen since they were first exhibited internationally three decades ago.  MORE about this exhibition here

STEVE BIKO

Stephen Biko (18 Dec 1946 – 12 Sep 1977) was an anti-apartheid activist in South Africa in the 1960s and 1970s, arguably the most dynamic political leader of his time. A student leader, he later founded the Black Consciousness Movement which would empower and mobilise much of the urban black population into a state of self awareness and defiant protest. He was constantly under police surveillance, arrested and banned resulting in his murder in police detention in 1977.

There are many more exhibitions and activities arranged during this festival of photography, more information here

Related Links

The Guardian

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Blurb Books