Oxford School of Photography

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Tag Archives: Guardian

Photographs Not Taken: what makes a photographer freeze?

“The American photographer Christian Patterson was driving along a deserted road in rural Nebraska when he saw a house on fire. He jumped out of his car and ran towards the house, but the intense heat drove him back. As he was about to take a picture of the scene, a truck pulled up and a man jumped out. He fell to his knees, crying. A fire truck arrived but, by then, the house and all its contents were reduced to ash……..These are just two of the 62 stories collected by Will Steacy in a new book, Photographs Not Taken, published by Daylight. In his introduction, Steacy, a photographer himself, describes it as “a collection of essays by photographers about moments that never became a picture”. He writes: “Here, the process of making a photograph has been reversed. Instead of looking out into the world through a camera lens, these essays look directly into the mind’s eye to reveal where photographs come from in their barest and most primitive form – the original idea.” WRITES  in the Guardian , more here

This is an interesting idea, I sometimes muse on missed opportunities, I am slightly concerned though that something that was not taken can be called a photograph. If it is a photograph not taken then by definition it cannot be a photograph…enough all too confusing.  As always Sean O’Hagen writes cogently and with interest.

Below is a photograph not taken

Tate’s national photographic archive ‘rescued from skip’ after internal tipoff

reports in The Guardian today

“An art charity saved the crucial collection after employee’s call, but another archive was dumped by the V&A”

Tate photographic collection

The Tate’s discarded archive, now stored on these shelves, contained photos of art from its collections and beyond, such as these images of two John Hoppner works. Photograph: Graeme Robertson for the Guardian

“Art historians have been disturbed by allegations that the Tate was about to dump its invaluable photographic archive in a skip when another institution realised its importance and rescued it, and that the Victoria & Albert Museum has already destroyed its own thematic archive. Curators, who consider such resources vital, were not consulted.

The archives were full of photographs of artworks from their collections and beyond – crucial visual histories, invaluable for comparative research and for studying any deterioration as a result of time or restoration.”.…MORE

Lucy Nicholson – photo-journalist

From The Guardian

“London-born photographer Lucy Nicholson has worked in Northern Ireland, Chile and Mexico and is now based in Los Angeles working as a senior staff photographer for Reuters. In January, Lucy photographed the women and children living at Hope Gardens Family Centre, a homeless shelter run by Union Rescue Mission on the outskirts of Los Angeles”

See the slide show here

Lucy Nicholson is an unusual mix of hard hitting photo journalism from some of the most war ravaged places in the world and a top sports photographer. Her work is continually of the highest order and there is much to be admired, this is a link to her website

Lucy also has a blog which has galleries of recent photo essays, excellent stuff if you are interested in photo journalism, here is a link to the blog

Tokyo photobloggers gallery

The Guardian has a whole Tokyo thing going on at the moment, so this is also from their pages, the full set of images can be seen here

“As part of our Tokyo city guide, we asked locals photo bloggers and photographers to pick their two favourite images of the city. View their selections below … from ninjas on the metro to snowfall in Shibuya.

From Lee Chapman of the Tokyo Times blog: “It’s true that Tokyoites work hard, but in a country of hobbyists, they are often equally committed to the more pleasurable things in life too, and of all the amateur painters, musicians and sports lovers I’ve seen, the dedication of this particular man was a genuine joy to see.”

Adrian Storey/Uchujin: “The city that invented the term ‘karoshi’ (death from over work) and a culture of alcohol abuse takes it’s toll on another salaryman”

From Lee Chapman of the Tokyo Times blog: “Despite Tokyo’s much-touted modernity, it’s often a very thin veneer that masks a surprisingly traditional city, and this lovely old lady in some ways embodies that, as well as highlighting the ageing of Japanese society as a whole.”

More from the archives – Norman Parkinson – in pictures

Again from the Guardian, do they not understand the meaning of news?

“An exhibition opens this weekend of original vintage prints by Norman Parkinson, who revolutionised fashion photography in the 1950s and 60s. The photographs, owned by Parkinson’s former assistant, Angela Williams, will be on show at the M Shed in Bristol from 21 January to 15 April. Many of the 60 prints are previously unseen”..MORE

The M Shed in Bristol is a large museum of the life of Bristol which also show other exhibitions, a fascinating visit and now you can get to see some of Norman Parkinson’s pictures

all images ©Norman Parkinson

Webfeed From the agencies – galleries of photo-journalism

If you are enjoying these images from the various sources of photo-journalism you would like the series in the Guardian called ‘From the Agencies’ here is a link to the page that has a number of galleries from around the world.

“Showcasing some of the world’s best photojournalists.

The Guardian receives many thousands of pictures every day, some days more than 20,000. Of these, many are publicity hand-outs, soft paparazzi images and material for the sports pages.

However, among all these photographs there are some real gems. The agencies that the Guardian subscribes to – AP, Reuters and Getty Images, among others – have some truly great photojournalists on their staff and under contract, although they probably would be too modest to describe themselves as such. We would like to recognise some of these unsung heroes by presenting their work in galleries, rather than publish them in the usual, one-off, spot news format

Here are some from the featured photographers

Engi, five, Ziona’s youngest, poses with other children from the family Photograph: Adnan Abidi/Reuters
Locals mingle at a market in Thimphu, Bhutan, on the eve of the royal wedding between King Jigme Khesar Namgyel Wangchuck and Jetsun Pema Photograph: Paula Bronstein/Getty Images
National Transitional Council (NTC) fighters on the runway of the airport in Sirte, Libya. The city is of vital strategic importance and has now been surrendered by pro-Gaddafi forces, says the NTC Photograph: Manu Brabo/AP

New Photographers Gallery at the V & A

On 24 October 2011, the V&A’s new Photographs Gallery will open to the public. The gallery will have an inaugural  display of works by key figures of photographic history including Victorian portraits by Julia Margaret Cameron and significant works by Henri Cartier-Bresson, Man Ray, Afred Stieglitz, Diane Arbus and Irving Penn.

The Photographs Gallery will draw upon the  V&A’s internationally renowned collection of photographs, and will chronicle the history of photography from 1839 up to the 1960s. In 1858, the V&A became the first museum to exhibit photographs, and the new Photographs Gallery is able to showcase some of the most technically brilliant and artistically accomplished photographs in its collection. Temporary displays, primarily showcasing contemporary photography, will be shown in the V&A’s existing photographs gallery.

more on this article here

there is also an interesting article in The Guardian by

Photography is a mechanical art. The photographer points a lens at an object, records the image on a plate or film or, today, in digital memory. Therefore all photographs should be similar, the hands of individual photographers unrecognisable. Yet the new Photographs Gallery at the V&A, which opened on Monday to showcase the world’s oldest museum collection of photographs, reveals the apparently limitless variety of the art and the utterly personal genius of great photographers.

A photograph of a steam train taken by Alfred Stieglitz in 1902 hangs near Henri Cartier-Bresson‘s 1932 picture Behind Gare St Lazare, Paris, on the blue-painted wall of the long, elegantly restored, Victorian gallery.” ....more of this here

Isambard Kingdom Brunel and the Launching Chains of ‘The Great Eastern’

Robert Howlett (1830-58), ‘Isambard Kingdom Brunel and the Launching Chains of ‘The Great Eastern”, 1857. Museum no. PH.246-1979

Roslyn Chapel

Roger Fenton (1819-69), ‘Roslyn Chapel’, 1856. Museum no. 290-1935

TtV photography: how to create vintage-style photographs

This is a really cool idea and a way of using your old camera with your new

Angie Muldowney demonstrates how to create unique, vintage-looking photographs with all the convenience of a digital camera in The Guardian, full article here

“I love taking pictures using the Through the Viewfinder technique. If you’re unfamiliar with TtV photography, it means using a digital camera to take photos through the viewfinder of a vintage twin-lens camera. Yes, there are lots of apps on smartphones these days that can instantly apply filters to achieve similar results, but by using this hand-crafted contraption you can create images that are totally unique. No one else’s dusty old viewfinder will be exactly like yours. What’s more, it means a lovely old camera gets a second lease of life!”

You should have a look at Angie’s site here

Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2011 highly commended images

The Guardian has a selection of images from the highly commended section of this award, as with the winning selection we featured last week these are quite stunning. More can be seen on the Guardian site here

Behaviour: Birds – Taking Flight, Paul Goldstein Paul arrived very early on the shores of Lake Nakuru, Kenya, before the rising sun had burned off the mist. He had returned to photograph the greater and lesser flamingos and used shade, shadow and silhouette to create drama, rather than emphasising their vivid colours with sunlight. He was helped by a combination of circumstances: rain during the night, a rapidly clearing sky, enough time for the cold air to form mist over the alkaline waters, and a hyena hunting for young or infirm birds along the far shore of the soda lake. The predator set up a wave of panic, with those closest to it taking flight and those nearest to Paul standing alert. Ten minutes later, not only had the whole flock lifted up, but the mist had also burned off, completely changing the scene. Photograph: Paul Goldstein/WPY
Behaviour: Mammals – The Charge by Eric Pierre (France) Eric had been tracking Arctic wolves on Victoria Island, Canada, when his guide spotted a herd of muskoxen 3 miles (5km) away. Approaching, Eric could see that the herd was nervous, probably because wolves were also on its trail. He made a detour and stopped about half a mile away upwind. Suddenly, he realised that the herd was now running towards them, oblivious of them. “I’ve seen muskoxen run away,” says Eric. “I’ve seen them react to a threat by forming a circle, and I’ve even seen a male charge. But I’ve never seen a herd spread out into a charging line like this. I could hear the thundering of their hooves. It was one of those situations where it really mattered that I made the right choice between technical accuracy, aesthetics and security.” Photograph: Eric Pierre/WPY
The exhibition information:

Exhibition and tickets

2011 Veolia Environnement Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition
21 October 2011 – 11 March 2012

Open 10.00 – 17.50 daily

Book tickets now

This world-renowned yearly exhibition at the Natural History Museum provides a spotlight on the rarely seen wonders of the natural world.

From 21 October, enter an atmospheric space inside the exhibition gallery and be inspired by this year’s competition winners. The images are selected from 1000s of international entries and are beautifully displayed in sleek backlit installations

The month in photography

The Observer New Review’s monthly guide to the 20 best photographic exhibitions and books, featuring Luc Delahaye, Lewis Hine, Vanessa Winship, Julia Margaret Cameron and Pieter Hugo.….more