Oxford School of Photography

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Tag Archives: Digital Camera World

Nikon D3300 vs D3200 vs D3100: which camera should you choose?

Nikon has released a new entry level camera but still has the earlier versions in the range available, this article might help you decide which you should choose

Nikon has used the CES show in Las Vegas to launch its latest DSLR, the Nikon D3300. This is an entry-level camera designed for beginners, but boasts some important developments and additions.

But Nikon’s existing D3000-series beginners models will also continue for now. So how does the new Nikon D3300 compare vs the D3200 and D3100? In our Nikon D3300 vs D3200 vs D3100 comparison we examine 15 key specifications to see how they differ and how significant these differences are likely to be. READ MORE HERE

 

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DSLR Video Recording: HD movies and what you absolutely have to know

In class last night someone asked about HD video recording with a DSLR. I started to answer some of their question and quickly realised it would take more than the 10 minutes left of the class and said I would do a little research and send them some links about it. I found this article which although hardly definitive does go some way to answering the questions many people have. I will return to this subject in later posts but for now if you are thinking about using your DSLR for video read this article from Digital Camera World

We take it for granted that new cameras these days come with the capability of recording HD movies. Once scoffed at, DSLR video recording has come into its own, and this feature is now one of the first things people check on the specification list when new cameras are announced. In fact, advances in DSLR video capability have created legions of dedicated HDSLR users, who find the versatility of being able to record HD movies on your camera a wonderful creative freedom.

In this tutorial we’ll start by answering some of photographers’ common questions about DSLR video, then explore some of the finer points of making HD movies, such as how to pace your film, understanding frame rates and what direct controls on your camera can make the DSLR video process easier for you.

If you want more go here

50 photography tips from jobbing pros to famous photographers

Advice. It’s a funny thing. If we applied all of photography’s apparent rules and dos and don’ts to our work, there would be little, if any, room for creativity and surely that’s the point. So you’ll find no textbook photography tips here; instead we asked 50 top pro and famous photographers to share the secrets they’ve gleaned from years of shooting day in day out.Expect to be inspired and challenged by the advice of famous photographers like David Bailey and Mary Ellen Mark, as well as up-and-coming names and photographers who make it their business to take amazing pictures for their clients each day…..READ MORE

Here is no 1 of 50

6 – Bob Aylott
To never miss a street picture, always have your camera set to 1/250 sec at f/5.6, ISO 400. When the clocks change for summer, change the aperture to f/8 instead.

Bob is an award-winning former Fleet Street photographer who has gone on to interview the world’s best shooters.

 

Amazing Pictures: 50 tips from jobbing pros to famous photographers

Here is number 13

Amazing Pictures: 50 tips from jobbing pros to famous photographers

13 – David Loftus
I remember being told at art college: ‘Always shoot with the sun behind you or to the sides to avoid flare.’ Some of my favourite shots have been taken when I’ve allowed flare to happen – fashion shots, portraits and interiors have all benefited on occasion… Keep some thick black paper and a roll of gaffer tape in your kit bag so you can extend your lens hood into more of a funnel shape, so that the flare isn’t too excessive, and shoot away.

David is one of the big names in food photography, having worked with the likes of Heston Blumenthal and Jamie Oliver. He shot Jamie’s last six books.