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Tag Archives: Brian Griffin

Ageing and creative decline in photography

“Photographers never want to talk about the fact that they may well be in decline. It’s the greatest taboo subject of all,” says Martin Parr in our special issue devoted to ageing, available now on newsstands, on the iPad and the iPhone. We spoke to photographers aged 19 to 100 about their career highs and how they keep their work fresh in the face of creative decline. ….

How do photographers keep their work fresh in the face of what Martin Parr describes as “probably the greatest taboo subject of all” – creative decline? In the June edition of BJP, we spoke to photographers aged 19 to 100 and asked them when they think they were at their peak. Do photographers hit their stride in their thirties, or is that merely a myth?

 The June issue of BJP, which centres around the issue of age, is available from today at newsstands in the UK, and on the iPad and iPhone worldwide.

It features exclusive interviews with Don McCullin, Martin Parr, Alec Soth, Saul Leiter, David Goldblatt, Duane Michals, Brian Griffin, Vanessa Winship, George Georgiou, Adam Broomberg & Oliver Chanarin, Wolf Suschitzky, Olivia Bee, Max Pinckers, Anna Orlowska, Anouk Kruithof and Lorenzo Vitturi.

Below, some of our highlights: see the article here

Olivia Bee, 19
“I don’t like to be known only by my age, but I know that because I’m 19 my age is a ‘thing’. It has always been a thing. I would prefer to be known as a photographer or an artist, rather than as a 19-year-old photographer.”

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Image © Olivia Bee

Duane Michals, 81
“I was a late bloomer. I didn’t become a photographer until I was 28, and I didn’t go to photography school. In many ways, I’ve been a wolf in the hen house, dancing around what photography does rather than showing the world as it is. A photograph shows nothing.”

duane-michalsMolly Bloom, 2012. Image © Duane Michals, courtesy of DC Moore Gallery

Read our highlights

Brian Griffin on Corporate Photography Thursday 7th August

The Social is back at The Photographers’ Gallery on Thursday, and this time we’re proud to have Brian Griffin speaking on corporate photography……

From Eurostar to Rekyjavik Energy, Brian Griffin has shot some of the biggest and best corporate commissions in the business. So who better to talk through corporate photography at The Social this Thursday? BJP and The Photographers’ Gallery are proud to announce that Brian will be joining us to talk through his experiences in this field and discuss how to get creative within this underrated area.

Also joining us will be photographer Brijesh Patel and project manager Franck Jehanne, who founded the Kalory Agency last year to specialise in creating photography and marketing content for the luxury, fashion and beauty industries. Now a team of eight people, Kalory has picked up lucrative contracts with Jaeger, Cartier, Vacheron Constantin and Mikimoto.

The Social is run by The Photographers’ Gallery and the British Journal of Photography, and takes places once a quarter at The Photographers’ Gallery, 16-18 Ramillies Street, London W1F 7LW from 7pm-9pm. The Corporate Photography special will take place this Thursday, 07 August.

The Photographers Gallery Events and Talks

From the Guardian’s Best Shot Series we have this from Brian Griffin

Four years ago, I was doing a big project in Iceland. It meant travelling all round, and at one point I went to the small town of Höfn, in the southeast corner. It has 1,500 people, one bar, one hotel. It’s like the end of the world – there’s nothing there. It looked like the most difficult place on earth to take pictures. So I decided to spend a month there, to see what I could do, even though this was before the crunch and Iceland was frighteningly expensive.

In May 2007, I housed myself in Höfn’s hotel. In that month, no one there made any attempt to even talk to me. No one bought me a drink, or invited me for a meal. I spent every single day on my own, except for the times when my wife Brynja, who’s from Iceland herself, came for a visit. As we drove around one day, I noticed this extraordinary-looking farmer.

While Brynja was asking if he’d mind being photographed, she spotted a newborn lamb and offered the farmer £350 to spare its life. She christened it Steinunn, a common woman’s name in Iceland. It struck me as the perfect way to shoot the farmer, so I brought out my lights. I shot in black-and-white on a Hasselblad. Looking at the sky, I think the rain was coming in. Iceland has extraordinary light quality: the cloud structure changes rapidly, the sunlight cascades through.

I didn’t have anything planned. It just occurred to me to ask him to lie down. I’m always looking for the unusual. There’s something spiritual about this picture: Christian iconography always seems to be hanging around in my work. “I want to make sure the lamb lives a complete life and won’t be slaughtered,” my wife told the farmer at one point. “You’re not going to kill it and eat it.” Brian Griffin

Four photographers win Birmingham’s big commission

In the BJP by Diane Smyth

Brian Griffin, Michael Collins, Andrew Lacon and Stuart Whipps have all won a place in Reference Works, the largest photography commission ever undertaken in Birmingham.

The four have been commissioned by Birmingham Library and Archive Services’ Photography Department to photograph the existing Central Library and document its transition and relocation into the newly-built Library of Birmingham next year. Collins, Lacon and Whipps have been asked to focus on the architecture of the old and new buildings, while Griffin will concentrate on photographing the people involved with the project. The images will go on show in the new gallery, along with photographs from the Library’s archive charting the history of Birmingham, and will also be published in a commemorative book.

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Brian Griffin will take portraits of the people involved with building Birmingham’s new city library, in a major commission established by Birmingham City Council and supported by the Arts Council. This image shows Charles Baldwin, Project Director, and Simon Dingle, Operations Director, Carillion, from the Library of Birmingham. Image © Brian Griffin.