Oxford School of Photography

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Tag Archives: Brett Rogers

Renaissance Photography Competition 2012

I am really sorry not to have known about this before and to have failed to alert you to the exhibition at The Mall Galleries, London SW1 that closes today. If you are in London and have the time go and have a look, it is always so much better to see photographs as prints than viewed on a screen.

The Renaissance Photography Competition is in support of young women with breast cancer, a very worthy cause and one to give your time to. Set up in 2007 by Fiona Gifford, an amateur photographer who survived cancer after being diagnosed in 2006.

Many photography competitions in support of causes seem to attract rather dull images, nothing to shout about, that is definitely not the case with Renaissance. As soon as I saw some of the winning images I was struck but how intelligent and mature the art of photography was being used by the entrants. The website has all the winning entries for you to see and buy as prints and your love of photography would have to be a moribund husk not to find something that you would want to own.

Exhibition

100 photographs selected by judges Monica Allende, Michael Hoppen, Brigitte Lardinois, Mary McCartney and Brett Rogers will be exhibited in the Mall Galleries, Pall Mall, London.

The exhibition will be open to the public from 11 June to 16 June 2012 (admission free).

Photographs will be available for purchase.

Renaissance Prize 2012

Anastasia Taylor-Lind (United Kingdom)

disorientation
Digital
From The Series The National Womb: Baby Boom In Nagorno Karabakh

Calumet Film Prize 2012

Julieta Sans (United Kingdom)

expression
Film
Untitled

Untitled

Category Prize - Disorientation

Dom Agius (United Kingdom)

disorientation
Digital
Matthew: Under My Umbrella

Category Prize - Environment

Tom Hatton (United Kingdom)

environment
Film
Madaba

Madaba

Category Prize - Expression

Mimi Mollica (United Kingdom)

expression
Film
Untitled

Untitled

Category Prize - Memory

Mattia Vacca (Italy)

memory
Digital
Srebrenica. Requiem For A Dream

Srebrenica. Requiem for a dream

Category Prize - Perspective

Alessandro Falco (Italy)

perspective
Digital
Vengeance N° 1

Vengeance n° 1

The following images were shortlisted for awards.

Mustafah Abdulaziz (Germany)

memory
Film
November, 2010.

November, 2010.

Philip Cheung (Canada)

expression
Digital
Soldiers’ Angels – U.s. Mortuary Affairs In Afghanistan

Soldiers' Angels - U.S. Mortuary Affairs in Afghanistan

Cristina De Middel (United Kingdom)

memory
Digital
Bongo

BONGO

Régis Defurnaux (Belgium)

perspective
Digital
Contemporary Identities

Contemporary identities

Salomon Fargeon (France)

memory
Digital
Seventy Years Later

Seventy Years Later

Colin Hutton (United Kingdom)

expression
Digital
That Royal Wedding

Florence Iff (Switzerland)

environment
Digital
Post Arcadia 1

Post Arcadia 1

Simon Impey (United Kingdom)

perspective
Digital
My Point Of View

My Point of View

Alvaro Laiz (Spain)

environment
Digital
Transmongolian

Transmongolian

Cynthia O’Dell (United States)

memory
Digital
Tullig Village, Kilrush, Co. Clare, 2006/1849

Tullig Village, Kilrush, Co. Clare, 2006/1849

Istvan Prem (United Kingdom)

disorientation
Digital
Tin Foil Dream

tin foil dream

Greta & Manu Schnetzler (United States)

perspective
Film
Wow

WOW

Luke Smith (United Kingdom)

environment
Film
Isolation

Isolation

Catrine Val (Germany)

disorientation
Digital
Fem!nist#4

Britain’s photographic revolution

Fascinating article in the Guardian/Observer by at the weekend regarding the state of photography as considered as art in Britain. O’Hagen is one of the most impressive writers on photography in Britain and the article absolutely to the point.

“The big art institutions here are finally catching up with their American counterparts, with a new photography gallery at the V&A, increased prominence at the Tate and exciting plans elsewhere. We asked four leading curators about the state of the art……..The September issue of the art magazine Frieze ran a glossary of “keywords” in contemporary art and culture. Under “Photography” the compilers wrote: “The first photograph was produced in 1826. In 2009 Tate advertised the following job for the first time: Curator (Photography and International Art). Discuss.” The question invited was: why had it taken so long for photography to be viewed as a serious art form in Britain? The Museum of Modern Art in New York, for instance, appointed its first curator of photography, Beaumont Newhall, in 1940.”.………….more

 

Snap happy: leading curators (l-r) Martin Barnes (V&A), Brett Rogers (Photographers’ Gallery), Simon Baker (Tate Modern) and Charlotte Cotton (the Media Space). Portrait by Suki Dhanda for Observer New Review