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Category Archives: Street Photography

Paying it Forward: Stuart Franklin on teaching the next generation of photographers

Stuart was a member of the original Photogragraphers Workshop when we were based in St Marys Road Oxford. It was a darkroom and studio hire centre so anyone interested in making their own photographs could come and develop film and make prints. Stuart lived in Oxford at that time and would come to make prints, he is a very friendly and helpful man so I am not surprised as his role as a Magnum photographer he is teaching the next generation.

The urge to document their world photographically is a drive that has undoubtedly been felt by many Magnum photographers; and it’s a practice that Stuart Franklin explores in his 2016 book The Documentary Impulse, charting the motivation to visually tell stories and represent the world far back beyond the invention of the camera, all the way to cave painting. From pre-history onwards he explores a history of photographic representation in visual culture and many of the practical and ethical issues that form the backdrop to the current landscape of the industry. Through teaching, Franklin aims to help a new generation of photographers go beyond the practicalities of technique and understand their practice within the weight of this context. Here, Franklin discusses what there is to gain from a photography education, and explains how he experienced the ‘documentary impulse’ himself. You can read more here

Stuart Franklin Tiananmen Square, Beijing, China 26th May 1999. ©Stuart Franklin

On a personal level, how have you felt or experienced the ‘impulse’ in your own practice?
An impulse or obsession is almost crucial to a life in documentary. I have explored a number of ideas – still working on some today – with an irrational drive, where work that I’m pursuing, and the way I’m doing it, makes absolutely no economic sense. Most of my books evolve in that way: Footprint, The Time of Trees, Narcissus, La Città Dinamica – even The Documentary Impulse. I work on projects because I am impelled to do so.

“In visual storytelling coherence across a body of work is an essential part of authorship”

– Stuart Franklin

Read the full article here and find out about the course Stuart is running

Stuart Franklin is teaching on the Intensive Documentary Photography Course with London College of Communication and Magnum Photos. More information about this course, including details on how to apply can be found here.

The Ultimate Guide to Street Photography

In this extensive article from Digital Photo School, it will help you understand more about street photography, how to do it, and all the things you need to think about including equipment, ethics, and even legalities. This is the ultimate guide to street photography to help get you started in this genre of photography.

Lao Cai market

Lao Cai market

OUTLINE

  1. What is street photography?
  2. Ethics and overcoming your fear.
  3. The law and street photography.
  4. A few of the most important tips to get you started.
  5. Equipment.
  6. Camera settings.
  7. Composition and light.
  8. Advanced tips.
  9. Content and concepts of street photography.
  10. Editing.
  11. Master street photographer research.

1. WHAT IS STREET PHOTOGRAPHY?

Street photography is an inherently clunky term, and because of this, there are many street photographers that dislike it. They consider themselves photographers, plain and simple.

The first image that typically comes to mind for the term street photography, is an image of a stranger just walking down the street in a city like New York, London, or Tokyo. This is a huge part of street photography of course, but it is only one part, and it can cause confusion over the true meaning of what street photography really is all about, and how it can be done.

Street photography is candid photography of life and human nature. It is a way for us to show our surroundings, and how we as photographers relate to them. We are filtering what we see, to find the moments that intrigue us, and to then share them with others. It’s like daydreaming with a camera.

READ the full article here

Urban photographer of the year 2015

Another photographer of the year in the genre of Urban Photographer sponsored by CBRE which is a real estate company. I found this on the BBC site

A portrait of a watch repairer has been crowned the winner of this year’s CBRE Urban Photographer of the Year competition, beating more than 21,000 entries from 113 countries.

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The portrait by Oscar Rialubin from the Philippines is called Xyclops.

Martin Samworth, chief executive of CBRE said: “The competition constantly provides us with new perspectives on working environments within cities. This year was no exception and Rialubin’s intimate portrait of a watch repairman gives insight into a universal trade. Urban life is constantly changing and the beauty of the competition is that it has captured this every year through the winning images.”

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Johanna Siegmann photographed professional dog walker Leslie in Malibou, California.

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Cocu Liu won the mobile section of the competition, capturing this winter scene in Chicago on his phone camera.

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The Europe, Middle East and Africa prize was awarded to Armen Dolukhanyan for another black-and-white picture. This one shows a young couple, both in the Ukrainian police force.

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Peter Graney’s photograph of poultry being prepared for market in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, won him the Asia Pacific prize.

Here is the link to the BBC page and here is the link to the CBRE Urban Photographer of the Year 2015 strangely there doesn’t seem to be an associated exhibition which is the usual fare with these things

 

 

 

Devin Allen – The amateur photographer capturing the story of the #BaltimoreRiots

From The BBC

An amateur photographer has been scooping the international media with his photographs from the front lines of protests and riots in Baltimore.

The death of a black man fatally injured in police custody has sparked bothpeaceful protests and violent riots in Baltimore. Twenty-five-year-old Freddie Gray died on 19 April – there’s more about what we know of his case here. The disturbances prompted the governor of the state of Maryland to declare a state of emergency in the city. A week-long curfew has been announced and as many as 5,000 National Guard troops could be deployed.

Hashtags such as #BaltimoreRiots and #BlackLivesMatter trended this week, but one of the most-shared pictures wasn’t taken by a local newspaper or by one of the legions of photojournalists based in Washington, just an hour away. Instead this photo by 26-year-old Baltimore native Devin Allen, has been retweeted more than 5,000 times:

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‘I’m for the protesters but against the rioters,’ Allen says. Underneath this photo of a white protester he wrote: ‘He stood on the front lines with us and got pepper sprayed….a brother saw his pain and came to his aid with milk ::::: Deeper than skin and if you stand with us your my brother and or sister idc [I don’t care] what color you are’

See the rest of the BBC article here

Go here for Devin’s Instagram Page

10 Ways to Improve Your Travel Photography

This  Post By: Gavin Hardcastle on Digital Photo School covers some of the basics all of which I teach on our very successful Travel Photography Course

Get the most out of your travel photography and capture the moment with these 10 simple tips. Most of these tips are pretty basic and some of them are useful for traveling in general.

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see the rest of the article here

 

Understanding a photograph…Picture power: Pausing the moment

So often people when viewing an image on screen or in a newspaper fail to understand that what they are looking at is an instant, a moment in time. Either side of that fraction of a second there could be a different scenario unfolding. It is the wonder of photography that we are all so adept at assimilating information from an image. But are we coming to false assumptions? This interesting article on the BBC website by Phil Coomes addresses this when considering images taken by Carl Court in London last week during a march by thousands of students protesting against education cuts, tuition fees and student debt.

But what was happening moments either side of when the frame was shot? What is going on just out of frame? Is this man alone, or with a group? And so on…

Here we have a young man about to strike at the window of a Starbucks coffee shop with a wooden stick, and inside two women are seemingly unaware of what is about to happen.

Initially that is it, and our reaction, or mine at least, is to wonder if the glass will break and when the women are going to look up and focus on what is happening outside……

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Each of us will see something slightly different in a photograph and will interpret it in our own way.

This then brings into play the other key figure in a picture – you, the viewer. Your views and beliefs will affect the way you see a picture. Is this a justified moment of protest against a multinational company, just mindless hooliganism, or even a gesture in the heat of the moment?

So whatever the subject matter it does no harm to look at the forces at work behind images you see in the news, or indeed elsewhere. How was it taken? Where would the photographer have had to be and how did they get there? Who is publishing it? What of the people in the picture? How are they influencing an image? And lastly, are you giving the picture a chance or have you made up your mind about it already?…

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images by Carl Court

Read the full article here

Pictures of the Week: October 10, 2014

From The Denver Post

Malala Yousafzai acknowledges the crowd at a press conference at the Library of Birmingham after being announced as a recipient of the Peace Prize, on October 10, 2014 in Birmingham, England. The 17-year-old Pakistani campaigner, who lives in Britain where she received medical treatment following an assassination attempt by the Taliban in 2012, was jointly awarded the peace prize with Kailash Satyarthi from India. Chair of the Committee Thorbjorn Jagland made the announcement in Oslo, commending Malala for her ‘heroic struggle’ as a spokesperson for girls’ rights to education.

"Malala Yousafzai Wins Nobel Peace Prize"

(Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

"APTOPIX France Eiffel Tower"

“A Visitors takes a photo on the new glass floor at The Eiffel Tower, during the inauguration of the newly refurbish first floor, in Paris, France, Monday, Oct. 6, 2014. Visitors of the Eiffel Tower can walk on a transparent floor at 188 feet high and look down through solid glass, with safety glass barriers around the edge. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)”

"APTOPIX India Nobel Peace Prize"

“An Indian child rescued by the workers of the NGO Bachpan Bachao Andolan or Save Childhood Movement which is run by Kailash Satyarthi, poses for a portrait at the Mukti Ashram in New Delhi, India, Friday, Oct. 10, 2014. Taliban attack survivor Malala Yousafzai became the youngest Nobel winner ever as she and Satyarthi of India won the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday for working to protect children from slavery, extremism and child labor at great risk to their own lives. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)”

"APTOPIX Spain Human Tower"

“Members of the Castellers Joves Xiquets de Valls try to complete their human tower during the 25th Human Tower Competition in Tarragona, Spain, on Sunday, Oct. 5, 2014. The tradition of building human towers or “castells” dates back to the 18th century and takes place during festivals in Catalonia, where “colles” or teams compete to build the tallest and most complicated towers. The structure of the “castells” varies depending on their complexity. A “castell” is considered completely successful when it is loaded and unloaded without falling apart. The highest “castell” in history was a 10 floor structure with 3 people in each floor. In 2010 “castells” were declared by UNESCO one of the Masterpieces of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)”

"TOPSHOTS-INDIA-RELIGION-HINDU-FESTIVAL"

“An Indian potter prepares clay lanterns used during Diwali celebrations ahead of the forthcoming Hindu festival in Jalandhar on October 8, 2014. Diwali, celebrated this year on October 23, marks the victory of good over evil and commemorates the time when the Hindu god Lord Rama achieved victory over Ravana, and returned to his kingdom of Ayodhya after 14 years exile. AFP PHOTO/SHAMMI MEHRA”

"APTOPIX Hong Kong Democracy Protest"

“A protester holds an umbrella during a performance on a main road in the occupied areas outside government headquarters in Hong Kong’s Admiralty in Hong Kong Thursday, Oct. 9, 2014. Talks between the Hong Kong government and student leaders of a democracy protest that has blocked main roads in the Asian financial hub for nearly two weeks are canceled because they’re unlikely to be constructive, a senior government official said Thursday. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)”

See more from this gallery here

World Press Photo Awards 2014

The annual World Press Photo exhibition is the best known of World Press Photo’s activities and is a highlight in the organization’s calendar.

Every year following the World Press Photo Contest, the winning images go on tour. In April, the exhibition is officially opened in Amsterdam and can be seen at venues around the globe until March of the next year. The tour program takes in approximately 100 cities in 45 countries and is still expanding.

The exhibition is a showcase for creativity in photojournalism and a platform for developments in the profession, part of World Press Photo’s aim of encouraging and stimulating the work of press photographers around the world. The show also attracts a broader public and, because of the wide-ranging focus of the contest, forms an eyewitness record of world events from the previous year.

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Survivors carry religious images, ten days after Typhoon Haiyan made landfall in the central Philippines.

ABOUT:

Philippe Lopez is a French national who has worked for Agence France-Presse (AFP) in Asia for 14 years. He began his career with the agency as a freelancer in Cambodia in 1999 and became a staff photographer the following year. In 2002, he was named as a photo editor in New Delhi, India, as part of the agency’s development of its South Asia photo desk. He joined the agency’s regional headquarters in Hong Kong as a picture editor in 2005 and became a staff photographer in Shanghai in 2009. He returned to the Hong Kong bureau in 2011.
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BOSTON MARATHON BOMBING 15 April 2013 Boston, USA

Carlos Arrendondo (left) climbs over barricades on Boylston Street, to reach people injured by the first of two bombs that exploded near the finish line at the Boston Marathon, on 15 April. The bombs went off 12 seconds apart, killing three people and injuring at least 264. The winners had crossed the line some hours earlier, but thousands of people were still to finish, and spectators lined the street. On 18 April, the FBI released photographs and video footage of two suspects, later identified as Chechen brothers, Dzhokhar and Tamerlan Tsarnev.  Shortly after they had been identified, the brothers allegedly killed a police officer and hijacked a car. Tamerlan died following the subsequent shoot-out with police, and Dzhokhar was arrested hours later.

JOHN TLUMACKI USA

ABOUT:

John Tlumacki has been a staff photographer for the Boston Globe for 32 years. He has covered three Winter Olympics, Superbowls, and World Series. He was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in 1989 for his coverage of the Berlin Wall. He was named Boston Press Photographer of the Year in 2011.
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FINAL EMBRACE 25 April 2013 Savar, Bangladesh

Victims lie in the rubble, on the day after the Rana Plaza building, which accommodated five garment factories, collapsed. The relationship between the two people is not known.

In the days following the disaster, more than 800 bodies were visually identified by relatives, or by using ID cards or personal possessions. Relatives of others had to give DNA samples, but months after the incident many had still not been able to identify missing family members. The collapse of the Rana Plaza ranks as one of the worst industrial accidents in history.

TASLIMA AKHTER Bangladesh WEBSITE: www.taslimaakhter.com

ABOUT:

Taslima Akhter was born in Dhaka, Bangladesh in 1974. Before devoting herself entirely to photojournalism and activism, she studied public administration at the University of Dhaka and photography at Pathshala, the South Asian Media Institute in Bangladesh. 
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Djibouti City, Djibouti African migrants on the shore of Djibouti city at night, raising their phones in an attempt to capture an inexpensive signal from neighbouring Somalia—a tenuous link to relatives abroad. Djibouti is a common stop-off point for migrants in transit from such countries as Somalia, Ethiopia and Eritrea, seeking a better life in Europe and the Middle East © John Stanmeyer, USA, VII for National Geographic
Exhibition in London

2014 Exhibition LONDON, Friday 7 November 2014 – Wednesday 26 November 2014

Southbank Centre, Royal Festival Hall

Belvedere Road

London
United Kingdom
 VISITING HOURS Daily: 10.00 – 23.00

Pictures of the Week: October 17, 2014

From the Denver Post

A woman wearing a facemask, as protection from volcanic ash, harvests ash covered chillies and tomatoes at a village in Karo district located, Sumatra island on October 14, 2014 as Mount Sinabung (background) continued to erupt. In February, Sinabung’s eruption killed about 17 people and forced more than 33,000 others to flee their homes.

A protester sits front of barriers against police officers at a main street in Mong Kok district in Hong Kong Friday, Oct. 17, 2014. Riot police cleared an offshoot Hong Kong pro-democracy protest zone in a dawn raid on Friday, taking down barricades, tents and canopies that have blocked key streets for more than two weeks, but leaving the city’s main thoroughfare still in the hands of the activists.

"APTOPIX Cuba Violins Photo Gallery"

“In this Oct. 9, 2014 photo, students tune their violins before class at the Manuel Saumell music school in Havana, Cuba. Before Cuba’s 1959 revolution, many students played violins, violas, cellos and bass from European workshops. After it, the Soviet Union provided violins and cellos, along with many other goods. Now, as Cuba struggles to revive its economy, students must make do with violins from China that too easily pop strings and lose their tone. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)”

"APTOPIX Serbia Putin"

“Members of the Serbian army march under heavy rain during a military parade in Belgrade, Serbia, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2014. Waving Russian and Serbian flags and displaying banners “Thank You Russia,” tens of thousands came to see the parade in Belgrade attended by Vladimir Putin, which marked the 70th anniversary of the liberation of the Serbian capital from the Nazi German occupation by the Red Army and Communist Yugoslav Partisans. (AP Photo/Marko Drobnjakovic)”

"APTOPIX Mexico Charro Horses Photo Gallery"

“In this Aug. 26, 2014 photo, 4-year-old patient Saul Valverde rides lying on the back of Andariego, a 19-year-old veteran horse retired from “charreria,” the Mexican version of a rodeo, at a corral in southern Mexico City. Andariego now works as a therapy horse, helping children with special needs. Horses can live another 20 years after their rodeo days. The lucky ones find second careers in breeding or as therapy horses. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)”

"APTOPIX India State Elections"

“Security men guard as Indian women arrive to cast their votes during the Haryana state elections in Bandhwadi, India, Wednesday, Oct. 15, 2014. The Indian states Haryana and Maharashtra are going to the polls Wednesday to elect representatives to their respective state legislatures. (AP Photo/Saurabh Das)”

"TOPSHOTS-INDONESIA-VOLCANO"

“A woman wearing a facemask, as protection from volcanic ash, harvests ash covered chillies and tomatoes at a village in Karo district located, Sumatra island on October 14, 2014 as Mount Sinabung volcano (background) continued to erupt. In February, Sinabung’s eruption killed about 17 people and forced more than 33,000 others to flee their homes. AFP PHOTO / SUTANTA ADITYA/AFP/GettyImages”

See the rest of the images from this gallery here

CBRE Urban Photographer of the Year 2014 – winning images

The theme of this year’s competition – Cities at Work – challenged photographers from around the world to capture the beauty and day-to-day reality of working life. The overall winner of the CBRE sponsored competition was German photographer Marius Vieth with his striking image ‘Masks of Society’

I found this in the Guardian, these images are all worth your time, go and have a look here

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Overall winner – Urban Photographer of the Year
Mask of Society  Photograph: Marius Vieth

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1pm: Beijing, China
Nappers  Photograph: Aron Suveg

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Winner – Europe, Middle East and Africa region
Dancing in the Street  Photograph: Carlos da Costa Branco

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7pm: Santiago de Compostela, Spain
An Exhibition Photograph: Manuel Paz-Castanal

These are all so good you have to go and look at the others here

this is a link to the organisers website