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Category Archives: New Camera

Canon EOS 800D

DP Review has a hands on look at this new camera from Canon.

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The T7i will be sold with a new kit lens: the Canon EF-S 18-55mm F4-5.6 IS STM. This new zoom is 20% smaller than its predecessors and a little slower, but in terms of handling, it suits the equally diminutive camera quite well. According to Canon, image stabilization should produce up to four stops of shake reduction. 

Able to focus in just 0.03 seconds in Live View, the Canon EOS 800D Digital SLR Camera Body is a high-quality DSLR that boasts the world’s fastest Live View AF system. It features a 24.2-megapixel sensor and fast DIGIC 7 image processor, which together deliver ready-to-print, detailed images. Its dual pixel CMOS AF mode tracks subjects as they move, focusing smoothly for professional results

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On the left of the top-plate you can see the tiny LED light which indicates when the camera’s built-in Wi-Fi is active. Speaking of Wi-Fi, the T7i has that plus NFC for easy pairing with Android devices and Bluetooth LE for instant photo transfer to a compatible smartphone. It’s also compatible with Canon’s new BR-E1 Bluetooth remote control.

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A brand new user interface guides beginner photographers through the process of choosing the right exposure modes and settings to get the shots they want.

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A fully-articulating 3″, 1.04 million-dot touch-sensitive LCD makes video shooting easy. In live view and video modes, focus can be set by touch. For video shooters, a 3.5mm diameter stereo mini jack is available for recording sound via an external microphone.

Key Features: Canon EOS 800D Digital SLR Camera Body

  • 24.2-megapixel sensor
  • DIGIC 7 image processor
  • 6 frames per second continuous focusing
  • Bright optical viewfinder
  • 45 cross-type autofocus points
  • Vari-Angle touch screen colour LCD screen
  • World’s quickest Live View AF system* focuses in as little as 0.03 seconds
    *Among interchangeable-lens digital cameras with APS-C sized sensors with phase-difference detection AF on the image plane as of 14th February 2017, based on Canon research.
  • Built-in flash with Guide Number of 12
  • Able to record 1080p Full HD video
  • Dual pixel CMOS AF tracking for focusing on moving subjects
  • In-body 5-axis image stabiliser
  • HDR movie shooting allows users to capture detail in shadows and highlights
  • WiFi, NFC, and Bluetooth connectivity
  • The body only will cost about £780 and available from April

 

10 best mirrorless cameras in 2016

A mirrorless camera, sometimes referred to as a csc type camera has interchangeable lenses like a dslr, usually as good quality as a dslr but does not have an optical viewfinder, some have electronic viewfinders some rely upon the monitor on the back for composing the pictures. They are gaining in popularity because they are small and light but offer good quality like a dslr camera. This review on Techradar will help you

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Once upon a time, keen photographers bought a DSLR – it was the established order of things. But the mirror mechanism of a DSLR is complex and noisy and adds to the weight of the camera, and that’s where the mirrorless camera, or compact system camera comes in. They keep the big sensors and interchangeable lenses of DSLR cameras but ditch the mirror to produce a smaller, lighter and simpler camera.

In fact, there are still pros and cons to both designs. If you want to find out more, read this: Mirrorless vs DSLR cameras: 10 key differences.

Some mirrorless cameras have a compact, rectangular body, some are styled like DSLRs with a ‘pentaprism’ on the top – though this houses an electronic viewfinder rather than the optical viewfinder you get with a DSLR.

Be aware, too, that cheaper mirrorless cameras don’t come with viewfinders at all – instead, you compose the photo on the rear screen, just as you do with a compact camera or a smartphone. (If you’re still not sure what kind of camera you need, read our easy to follow guide: What camera should I buy?)

No two photographers are exactly the same – we’re all looking for slightly different things, so we’ve ranked the 10 best compact system cameras you can buy right now based not just on specs, handling and performance, but size, simplicity and value for money too.

1. Fuji X-T2

A stunning camera perfect for enthusiast photographers

Sensor size: APS-C | Resolution: 24.3MP | Viewfinder: EVF | Monitor: 3.0-inch tilt-angle display, 1,040,000 dots | Maximum continuous shooting rate: 8fps | Movies: 4K | User level: Expert

Polished handling
Fast autofocus
No touchscreen
Not much else

2. Olympus OM-D E-M10 II

The brilliant E-M10 II ticks boxes you probably didn’t even know about

Sensor size: Micro Four Thirds | Resolution: 16.1MP | Viewfinder: EVF | Monitor: 3.0-inch tilt-angle display, 1,037,000 dots | Maximum continuous shooting rate: 8.5fps | Movies: 1080p | User level: Beginner/intermediate

Compact size, lenses too
Excellent viewfinder
Smaller sensor than some
Pricier than original E-M10

3. Sony Alpha A7R II

Sony’s highest resolution full-framer is going down a storm

Sensor size: Full-frame | Resolution: 42.4MP | Viewfinder: EVF | Monitor: 3.0-inch tilt-angle display, 1,228,800 dots | Maximum continuous shooting rate:5fps | Movies: 4K | User level: Expert

Huge, high quality images
Excellent quality viewfinder
Needs a faster AF point settings
Tilting rather than vari-angle screen

4. Fuji X-T10

The X-T10 makes access to Fuji’s terrific X-mount system affordable

Sensor size: APS-C | Resolution: 16.3MP | Viewfinder: EVF | Monitor: 3.0-inch tilt-angle display, 920,800 dots | Maximum continuous shooting rate: 8fps | Movies: 1080p | User level: Beginner/intermediate

Excellent build and design
Value for money
High ISOs are JPEG only
Lacks X-T1’s weatherproofing

5. Fuji X-Pro2

Classic styling houses a stack of features aimed at the enthusiast photographer

Sensor size: APS-C | Resolution: 24.3MP | Viewfinder: EVF & Optical | Monitor:3.0-inch display, 1,620,000 dots | Maximum continuous shooting rate: 8fps | Maximum video resolution: 1080p | User level: Expert

Clever viewfinder
Very good detail and colour
Fixed rear display
EV dial easily knocked
see all the review here on Techradar
Got the camera get a course to learn how to use it, we recommend our Understanding Your DSLR course, ideal for this sort of camera

10 best compact cameras 2016

so you have decided that someone in your life needs a new camera and a compact is the one, this review from Techradar will help you decide

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Compact cameras and the compact camera market have changed a lot over the last few years. Smart phones have decimated the entry-level range of point-and-shoot models that used to be popular and as a result manufacturers have concentrated on putting more advanced features into cameras to make them more attractive.

In addition to a move towards having physically larger sensors to boost image quality, some compact cameras now have lenses with long zoom ranges or wide apertures and there’s better control over exposure along with a much wider range of settings than in the past. Wi-Fi connectivity is also now de rigueur, so you can transfer shots quickly to a phone for sharing on Facebook etc.

Many enthusiast photographers used to be very sniffy about compact digital cameras, but there are now many that make a great alternative to a DSLR or mirrorless system camera.. And those who are new to photography and thinking about stepping up from a smartphone have some pretty sophisticated choices. There are small cameras that can slip in a pocket yet have huge zoom ranges, and large bridge cameras that look like DSLRs, but have a fixed lens and lots of automated easy-to-use options.

These cameras prove that you don’t have to buy a camera that takes interchangeable lenses to get great shots.

If you need a bit more help figuring out what kind of camera you need, then read this article: What camera should I buy?

Or if you already know what kind of camera you want, then check out our more specific compact camera guides:

1. Panasonic LX100

A compact masterpiece, with a big sensor, classic controls and a viewfinder

Sensor: Micro Four Thirds, 12.8MP | Lens: 24-75mm, f/1.7-2.8 | Monitor: 3-inch, 921,000 dots | Viewfinder: EVF | Continuous shooting: 11fps | Movies: 4K | User level: Intermediate/expert

Big sensor, small body
Traditional controls
Prone to lens flare
Modest resolution

2. Fuji X70

Great for those who want a larger than average sensor and traditional controls

Sensor: APS-C, 16.3MP | Lens: 28mm, f/2.8 | Monitor: 3.0-inch touchscreen, 1,040,000 dots | Viewfinder: No | Continuous shooting: 10fps | Movies: 1080p | User level: Expert

High quality APS-C format sensor
Traditional exposure controls
No viewfinder
Fixed focal length lens

3. Sony RX100 IV

Sony’s super-high speed sensor tech is brilliant but pricey

Sensor: 1-inch, 20MP | Lens: 24-80mm, f/1.8-2.8 | Monitor: 3-inch tilt-angle display, 1,228,800 dots | Viewfinder: EVF | Continuous shooting: 5.5fps | Movies: 4K | User level: Intermediate/expert

High-speed shooting and 4K
Compact design
The tech makes it expensive
Only a 3x zoom range

4. Panasonic TZ100 / SZ100

Panasonic’s premium travel camera has a larger sensor than the rest of the range

Sensor: 1-inch type, 20.1MP | Lens: 25-250mm, f/2.8-5.9 | Monitor: 3.0-inch touchscreen, 1,040,000 dots | Viewfinder: EVF | Continuous shooting: 10fps | Movies: 4K | User level: Beginner/Intermediate

1-inch type sensor
10x zoom range lens
Small electronic viewfinder
Fixed screen
Bought the camera now get the course, our Beginners Photography course is perfect for someone with a compact camera

Best entry-level DSLR 2016

It is that time of year when knowing what to buy to get one of the best cameras for your purposes and budget becomes more focussed because of the short time before it gets wrapped and stored under a tree. This might help from Techradar

If you’ve outgrown your point-and-shoot camera and feel like you’re ready to take your photography to the next step, then an entry-level DSLR is the obvious choice. You might also want to consider a mirrorless camera as an alternative, although you won’t find one with a viewfinder at the same price as a DSLR.

If you are thinking about a mirrorless camera, then you might want to read this: Mirrorless vs DSLR cameras: 10 key differences. Or, if you’re not sure what kind of camera you need at all, then read our easy to follow guide to camera types: What camera should I buy?

DSLRs deliver a big step up in image quality from a compact camera, far more manual control and the ability to change lenses to tackle a huge variety of projects. Obviously, the more features you want, the more you’ll pay, but do you actually need them? Our top camera is one of the cheapest on the market, but still offers impressive performance and image quality, plus enough features to handle most assignments, especially if you’re still learning.

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1. Nikon D3300

It’s not the most expensive entry-level DSLR, but we think it’s the best

Sensor: APS-C CMOS | Megapixels: 24.2MP | Lens mount: Nikon DX | Screen: 3-inch, 921,000 dots | Continuous shooting speed: 5fps | Max video resolution:1080p | User level: Beginner

Great image quality
Guide mode
Fixed screen
No built-in Wi-Fi

2. Canon EOS Rebel T6i / Canon EOS 750D

A compelling combination of top-notch ergonomics and a superb sensor

Sensor: APS-C CMOS | Megapixels: 24.2MP | Lens mount: Canon EF-S | Screen:3-inch articulating touchscreen, 1,040,000 dots | Continuous shooting speed:5fps | Max video resolution: 1080p | User level: Beginner/enthusiast

Terrific sensor
Wi-Fi with NFC
Average battery life
Only 95% viewfinder coverage

3. Nikon D5500

Choosing between Canon and Nikon is tougher than ever

Sensor: APS-C CMOS | Megapixels: 24.2MP | Lens mount: Nikon DX | Screen:3.2-inch articulating touchscreen, 1,040,000 dots | Continuous shooting speed:5fps | Max video resolution: 1080p | User level: Beginner/enthusiast

High-res, non-anti-aliased sensor
Touch-sensitive articulating screen
Slow live-view focussing
No GPS

4. Canon EOS Rebel T6s / Canon EOS 760D

Like the EOS 750D, but with better handling and a second LCD

Sensor: APS-C CMOS | Megapixels: 24.2MP | Lens mount: Canon EF-S | Screen:3-inch articulating touchscreen, 1,040,000 dots | Continuous shooting speed:5fps | Max video resolution: 1080p | User level: Beginner/enthusiast

Great touchscreen
Excellent sensor
AF point selection fiddly
Expensive
and remember the camera is nothing without knowing how to use it so head over to our courses and grab one now

New Canon Mirrorless Camera M5

There is a general move towards mirrorless cameras, these usually offer similar quality to full DSLR cameras but because they do not have optical viewfinders are much smaller and lighter. Sometimes they are referred to as CSC or compact system cameras although these often are more like compact cameras but with interchangeable lenses. The new Canon EOS M5 looks like a small DSLR, has interchangeable lenses and an EVF (electronic viewfinder). I have to say that the early EVFs left me cold, well worse I hated them. They looked like poor quality tv screens but the newer versions are so much better. This new camera will be competition for the Sony A7 range of which there are many different models, confusingly so.  The Sony is well established now and consider a serious camera so the new Canon M5 will have to offer more in some way.

Canon EOS M5

Techradar has a review of this new camera and says good things, but as yet there is no direct comparison review with the Sony

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Here is a chart that lists the specs

  • APS-C CMOS sensor, 24.2MP
  • ISO100-25,600
  • Dual Pixel CMOS AF
  • 7fps burst shooting
  • 1080p video
  • 3.2-inch touchscreen, 1,620,000 dots
  • £1049 / $979 (body only) – AUS$ price to be confirmed

In conclusion

Those issues aside, the EOS M5 looks like Canon might have finally come good with a mirrorless camera. With the arrival of Dual Pixel CMOS AF, autofocus appears to be a huge improvement over previous models. Factor in the inclusion of a built-in EVF and touchscreen interface, along with a well thought out set of controls, and the EOS M5 looks like it could be a good option for experienced users. Whether that’s enough now that other brands have established themselves in the mirrorless camera sector remains to be seen.

Go here for the Techradar review

and here for the DPReview on the Canon EOSM5

The 10 best DSLRs you can buy right now

TechRadar are one of my favourite sites for getting  no nonsense reviews of cameras, this and DP Review are the best sites out there if you want to know all about a camera, lens or flash. So here they are again telling you what is the best on the market now.

For decades, the DSLR (digital SLR) has been the top choice for anyone who wants to take their photography to the next level. Whether you’re a beginner or a pro, a DSLR offers three key ingredients: manual controls, excellent picture quality and interchangeable lenses.

Mirrorless cameras are another option of course. They’re smaller, mechanically simpler and, like DSLRs, they take interchangeable lenses. If you want to know more about how they compare, read this: Mirrorless vs DSLR cameras: 10 key differences. Or, if you want to know more about different camera types in general, check out our step-by-step guide: What camera should I buy?

A DSLR is still the cheapest way to get a camera with interchangeable lenses and a viewfinder (entry-level mirrorless cameras don’t have viewfinders) and, at the other end of the scale, almost all professional sports, press and wildlife photographers choose full-frame DSLRs over every other camera type.

In between are a whole range of digital SLRs aimed at different users, different levels of experience and different budgets. Here’s our pick of the standout DSLR cameras you can buy right now:

I have to admit I have a bias in this list. I bought a Canon 6D as my backup to my 5D and I love it. I love that it is lighter, it is as they say ‘old school’ and the quality it produces is just brilliant, but it only makes number 6 in their list

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6. Canon EOS 6D

Full-frame on a budget – the 6D’s straightforward design has old-school appeal

Sensor: full frame, 20.2Mp | Lenses: Canon EF (not EF-S) | Monitor: 3-inch, 1,040K dots | Viewfinder: Optical | Continuous shooting: 4.5fps | Movies:1080p | User level: Expert

Great value for a full frame camera
No fuss features
Basic autofocus system
Only 4.5fps continuous shooting

But don’t assume you need the latest tech to get a good camera. It’s tempting to chase the biggest numbers and newest gadgets when choosing a camera, but sometimes the simple things count for more. The EOS 6D is Canon’s cheapest full-frame DSLR, and compared to some of the other cameras around it, it’s a simple-minded old-school relic. But that full-frame sensor delivers a subtle quality and a sense of depth that you only get from a big sensor, and the no-fuss specs will appeal to quality-conscious photographers who like to keep things simple.

Read about all of their recommendations here

 

Sticking with a traditional dslr or going for a mirrorless camers

You know this is a question that keeps cropping up because we hate the weight and bulkiness of our gear. I am currently in Thailand soon moving on to Myanmar and then Vietnam and the weight of my gear has already put me in pain. So I understand, I really do, the gear is a pain. But then when I look at a csc or mirrorless camera I am so underwhelmed. I do get to see them, people bring them to class so this is not an ill informed view but they just don’t do what a REAL camera does. Maybe if you have never owned a dslr you would not be disappointed but if you have you should seriously spend some time with one of these Johnny Come Lateleys to the game before deciding to ditch your old system. Find a camera shop, if you can, T4 Cameras in Witney are the last in Oxfordshire and really do more than just hold it, put it to you eye, see how it feels.

Anyway enough of my bias, here is a very good article on Digital Camera World that puts two of the heavy-weights against each other

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There are highly attractive ‘all-rounders’ in both camps: cameras that don’t go overboard on megapixel count, yet aim to take everything from portraiture to landscape photography in their stride.

Two of our current favourites are the Canon 5D Mk III SLR, and the mirrorless Sony A7 II from Sony’s ‘ILC’ (interchangeable-lens camera) stable.

A major factor in choosing any ‘system’ camera is the depth and breadth of the system itself. You’re spoiled for choice when it comes to lenses and other accessories for the long-established line of Canon SLRs.

Sony’s mirrorless cameras are a much newer proposition, especially when it comes to full-frame models, but the range of compatible E-mount lenses has grown over the last couple of years, and an adaptor is also available for fitting A-mount lenses.

READ MORE HERE

2015 DSLR and Mirrorless cameras

From the excellent DP Review

In late 2015, many (if not most) consumers are likely to shop based on price and capability, rather than according to whether a certain model contains a mirror, or not. We think this is a good thing; with all the increased competition, cameras are improving more and at a faster rate than ever before. From the gear perspective, it’s certainly an exciting time to be a photographer.

In this category, you’ll find both mirrorless and DSLR cameras that are highly capable under a variety of shooting situations, offer built-in high-spec viewfinders – either optical and electronic – and an extensive array of external controls. The biggest differences in performance tend to come down to autofocus sophistication and video capability, but neither of those is dictated by the presence or lack of mirror.

The contenders are:

Most of the camera in this roundup are built around either Four Thirds or APS-C sensors. Sensor size plays a large part in determining the image quality a camera is ultimately capable of and, in general, the larger a camera’s sensor, the better the image quality and the more control you have over depth-of-field. APS-C sensors are larger than Four Thirds chips, but the differences are rarely huge. The outlier here is a single camera with a 1″-type sensor, a format that is significantly smaller than the other two.

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Of course the sensor sizes and image quality of these cameras are not the only thing that varies; the feature sets and performance of each camera are also quite different across the board. Within this category you’ll find weather-sealed cameras, cameras that can capture 4K video, cameras that can shoot bursts at incredibly high speeds with autofocus, and cameras that are simply well-balanced all-rounders. Which one should you buy? Read on to find out…

Sony Alpha 7R II Review

Like me you may be a bit confused by the very many Sony A 7 cameras, there seems to be many versions and understanding why and which you might want is a bit of a struggle. This review on the ever helpful DP Review might help you with the Sony Alpha 7R II

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The Sony a7R II is a 42MP full frame mirrorless camera with 5-axis image stabilization, featuring the world’s first (and currently only) 35mm BSI CMOS sensor, and including a hybrid autofocus system and 4K video capabilities. It’s the fifth in the company’s a7 range of full frame cameras and the second high-resolution ‘R’ model. However, although its name and appearance are very similar to the first round of a7s, the R II arguably represents just as significant a step forwards as those first full frame mirrorless models did.

The reasons for suggesting this are two-fold. Although the a7R II’s body is essentially the same as that of the 24MP a7 II (albeit with more substantial magnesium alloy construction), the camera includes two significant changes:

The first is that this is the first full frame camera to feature a sensor based on BSI CMOS technology. Although Sony always stressed that the benefits of BSI designs are most valuable in small sensors, its application on larger scales should reduce the pixel-level disadvantages of moving to higher pixel counts (which means an improvement in quality when viewed at a standard output size).

Secondly, and perhaps, most unexpectedly: the camera’s phase-detection autofocus capabilities have been increased to the point that it not only focuses quickly and effectively with its own lenses but can also do so with lenses designed for other systems. This may not sound like a big deal until you think about what Sony needs to do to make the camera a success: win-over dedicated photographers, many of whom are already committed to other systems.

Sony a7R II Highlight specifications

  • 42MP Full Frame BSI CMOS sensor
  • 399 on-sensor Phase Detection points
  • 5-axis image stabilization
  • Internal 4K recording from full sensor width or ‘Super’ 35 crop
  • Picture Profile system including ITU-709 and S-Log2 gamma
  • Full magnesium alloy construction
  • 2.36m dot OLED viewfinder with 0.7x magnification
  • High speed AF with non-native lenses
Sony a7R II Sony a7R Sony a7 II Sony a7S II
Sensor 42MP full-frame 36MP full-frame 24MP full-frame 12MP full-frame
Image Stabilization In-body In-lens only In-body In-body
Electronic First Curtain Shutter Yes No Yes Yes
Silent (full electronic) Shutter Yes No No Yes
ISO Range (Stills)
Standard / Expanded
100 – 25,600
50 – 102,400
100 – 25,600
50 – 25,600
100 – 25,600
50 – 25,600
100-102,400
50-409,600
Continuous Shooting (with AF) 5 fps 1.5 fps 5 fps 2.5 fps
AF system Hybrid (399 phase detect and 25 contrast detect points) Contrast AF with 25 points Hybrid with 117 phase detect and 25 contrast detect points Contrast AF with 169 points
4K from Super 35 crop? Yes No No No
4K Movie specs UHD 30/24p
XAVC S (100/60Mbps)
N/A N/A UHD 30/24p
XAVC S (100/60Mbps)
HD Movie specs 1080 60/30/24p
(50Mbps)
XAVC S
1080 60p
(28Mbps)
60i/24p (24/17Mbps)
AVCHD
1080 60/30/24p
(50Mbps)
XAVC S
1080 120p (100/60Mbps) 60/30/24p
(50Mbps)
XAVC S
Picture Profile
(inc S-Log2)
Yes No Yes Yes
+ S-Log3
Front panel construction Magnesium alloy Magnesium alloy Composite Magnesium alloy
Optical low pass filter No No Yes Yes
Battery life (CIPA)
LCD/EVF
340/290 shots per charge 340/270 shots per charge 350/270 shots per charge 370/310 shots per charge
Weight w/ battery 625 g 465 g 599 g 627 g
MSRP $3,199 body only $2,299 body only $1,699 body only $2,999 body only

 

Best bridge camera 2015

Bridge cameras look like dslr cameras, have built in lenses, usually super zooms and are often a choice for those who want more than a compact but not the weight of a dslr

Techradar says

Many predicted that bridge cameras would be wiped out by the rise of affordable DSLRs and compact system cameras, but the combination of immense optical zoom versatility and advanced features at an affordable price explains their enduring appeal.

The best bridge cameras now offer DSLR-like levels of control and fast, wide-aperture lenses, along with raw shooting and other useful extras such as Wi-Fi and articulated screens. Image quality didn’t used to be a bridge camera forte, due to their widespread use of small 1/2.3-inch sensors. These days, however, there are models with much larger 1-inch designs that rival the image quality of some compact system cameras.

Here is a cheapie

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6. Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ72

The FZ72 may be showing its age, but falling prices keep it in the game

Sensor size: 1/2.3-inch CMOS | Megapixels: 16.1 | Zoom range: 60x, 20-1200mm-equivalent | Screen type: 3-inch fixed, 460,000 dots | Viewfinder: Yes | Maximum continuous shooting rate: 9fps | Maximum video resolution:1080p | User level: Beginner/enthusiast

£198.00 
60x zoom
Raw format shooting
No Wi-Fi or touch sensitivity
Small, low resolution EVF

The FZ72 is one of the cheapest bridge cameras in our selection, yet it still sports a great zoom range with an impressive 20mm-equivalent wide angle focal length. Its lens aperture also opens up as wide as f/2.8, though it does narrow to f/5.9 at full zoom. Raw format recording and full manual control give the FZ72 enthusiast appeal, as does the attractive image quality. We would rank the FZ72 higher, but there?s no Wi-Fi and the relatively low screen and electronic viewfinder resolutions are a let-down. You?ll also have to do without an eye sensor to automatically switch between the two displays.

and here is one that is not cheap

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3. Sony RX10 II

Sony’s premium bridge camera has a heavy video slant and a price to match

Sensor: 1-inch, 20.2Mp | Lens: 24-200mm f/2.8 | Monitor: 3-inch 1,229K dots |Viewfinder: EVF |Continuous shooting: 14fps | Movies: 4K | User level:Enthusiast/expert

£1199.00 
4K video and 14fps continuous shooting
1-inch sensor and f/2.8 lens
Short zoom range for a bridge camera
High-tech 4K makes it expensive

The RX10 II has the same 24-200m F/2.8 lens and 1-inch sensor combination as the original RX10, making it a premium quality bridge camera for those prepared to sacrifice ultimate zoom range in exchange for a better camera. The RX10 II, however, adds Sony’s new ‘stacked sensor’ design for much faster data readout, 4K video and a 40x slow-motion mode. It’s evolved into an impressively high-tech stills video camera, but while videographers will be interested, it’s made it expensive compared to other bridge cameras for stills photographers – it’s a great camera, but the high price limits its appeal.

The majority of bridge cameras are well under £400 so look here if this is the type of camera for you