Oxford School of Photography

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Category Archives: Landscape Photography

Travel Photographer Of The Year Exhibition

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Image: Japanese Macaque © Jasper Doest/tpoty.com

An exhibition of images from the Travel Photographer of the Year (TPOTY) awards are to go on show in an outdoor exhibition for the first time at Lacock Abbey, Wiltshire, the birthplace of photography.

These award-winning photographs, submitted by amateur and professional photographers who beat entrants from almost a one hundred countries in 2013, drew some 37,000 visitors when they were displayed in London last summer, giving visitors who may have missed the London exhibition a chance to enjoy them now.

The photographs in the exhibition offer a glimpse into our magnificent and poignant world. From sweeping landscapes to bustling city scenes, from a lion on the hunt to a ‘snow monkey’ having a relaxed bath in Japan and some fascinating moments of human life, these images will take people on a journey around the world.

Running from 5 June to 12 July, Travel Photographer of the Year at Lacock Abbey gives photography fans the chance to view these images in the unrivalled and highly appropriate setting of the National Trust property which is considered the birth place of modern photography where Henry Talbot captured the first photographic negative.

The exhibition will be on show in the abbey’s Tudor courtyard, an historic part of the building’s 800 year history. It was also a location Talbot often used to take pictures and many of his famous photographs, including ‘The Open Door’, were taken there. This year the National Trust team at Lacock closed the courtyard to vehicles, making it a more relaxing and enjoyable space for visitors. TPOTY will be the first event held here.

Travel Photographer of the Year, 5 June to 12 July, daily from 10.30am to 5.30pm, in the Tudor courtyard at Lacock Abbey. National Trust members and under 5s go free. For more information please call 01249 730459 – 

Here is a link to our previous post

Travel photographer of the year 2014 winners – in pictures

There is also a showing of the 2014 winners in London, here is the information on that

2015 exhibition at the Royal Geographical Society in London

24th July until 5th September 2015

One of the joys of doing well in TPOTY is having your images displayed at the TPOTY exhibitions and being seen by thousands, sometimes millions, of people.

The home of the Travel Photographer of the Year exhibitions is the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG). The Society’s gallery is situated close to Hyde Park on the corner of Kensington Gore and Exhibition Road, and adjacent to the Royal Albert Hall, in the heart of London’s museum area.

Exhibition dates:

The 2015 exhibition is open every day from 24th July to 5th September 2015.

Opening hours

Sunday to Thursday – 10.00 to 17.00 hrs

Friday & Saturday – 10.00 – 19.00 hrs

The main exhibition is FREE

We also run a Travel Photography Course, here are the details, next starts 25th June 

 

The Natural Light Cycle for Photographers

From  Jim Hamel at DPS were find this article that clearly explains the effect of daylight as we move through the day from sunrise to sunset, very interesting

Natural light is what landscape photography is made of. Other forms of photography rely heavily on flash, but most landscapes rely entirely on the sun’s rays as their light source. That natural light from the sun is changing every second of the day. A picture taken at 9:00 a.m. will look fundamentally different than picture taken at 7:00 a.m., even if it is a picture of the exact same subject, from the exact same angle, using the exact same camera settings and focal length. Therefore, understanding these changes that occur throughout the day is critical to improving your landscape photography. By understanding these differing lighting conditions, you will know how and when to be set up and ready to take your landscape photos.

These changes in natural light don’t just affect the overall lighting and exposure level of your photos, but also things like color and contrast. Different lighting will lend itself to different camera effects. So in this article we will take a quick walk through the times of day for the landscape photographer, focusing on the unique advantages and challenges of each.

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read the full article here

Best photography competitions to enter in 2015

What a useful site DCW can be, here is a list of some of the most prestigious competitions for you to enter this year

Landscape Photographer of the Year 2015

The brainchild of renowned landscape photographer Charlie Waite, Take a View Landscape Photographer of the Year celebrates British landscapes. Although only landscapes taken in the UK are accepted, photographers from any country are welcome to enter, and with the grand title winner taking home a total prize worth £20,000, you might find entering is worth your while!

A Beginning and an End, Glencoe, Scotland

Image: A Beginning and an End, Glencoe, Scotland, by Mark Littlejohn

Travel Photographer of the Year 2015

Founded in 2003, Travel Photographer of the Year has grown to become one of the most prestigious photography awards in the world, receiving entries from around 100 countries each year.

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Image: By Philip Lee Harvey

International Garden Photographer of the Year

Run in association with the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew, the IGPOTY’s Ninth annual competition will take place this year, with an award of £5000 for the grand title winner, and an award of £2000 for the Portfolio winner.

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Image: My Prairie Garden by Rosanna Castrini

Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2015

The long-running and well-respected Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition, now in its 50th year, is co-owned by the prestigious Natural History Museum and BBC Worldwide. It now receives entries from around 100 countries across the globe. The top award for best single image is £10,000, along with a trophy and personalised certificate. There are other generous prizes for awards in other categories.

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Image: The last great picture by Michael ‘Nick’ Nichols

Sony World Photography Awards 2016

Priding itself on being the largest photography competition around, the Sony World Photography Awards attracts a large number of submissions from entrants – of all ages and skill levels – across the world.

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Image: by John Stanmeyer, winner of Contemporary Issues category

 

 

Ten photos capture the UK in 2014

From Phil Coomes at the BBC_79771078_pa-18605157

As we reach the end of 2014, Milica Lamb, picture editor at the Press Association (PA), selects some of the best shots captured by the news agency’s photographers across the UK.

“PA produced close to a quarter of a million images in 2014, so, as always, being tasked with selecting an editor’s choice for the year has proved incredibly hard – there are just too many amazing images I have had to leave out,” says Lamb.

“This year proved to be an eventful year, and with the general election, Rugby World Cup and the appearance of a new royal baby to look forward to, I expect next year to be even more exciting.”

Here is Milica Lamb’s selection with comments from the photographers.

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see the rest and explanation of the shots by the photographers here

Photography Courses For 2015

well we have done it again, created a new course to get you making better pictures. It has the most unwieldy title because we couldn’t think of anything better, sorry.

Basics of Landscape, Travel, Flower and Black and White Digital Photography

The course is based on our observations that these are the main subject areas along with portraiture, (which is covered in our separate Portrait Photography course), that interest our students. Each session we look at one of the four subject areas.

This course is aimed at students who already have a good understanding of how to use their cameras. There will be no instruction on camera use therefore it might be worthwhile taking our Understanding Your DSLR course first if you tend to use the fully auto mode when photographing. All areas of photography rely on technical and visual skills and although there will be references to camera use and composition there will be no in depth discussion of these areas and if you do not understand basic compositional methods our Composition In Photography course would be a great asset to you. Get full details here

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We now have our course schedule sorted out for the next term, here are the dates

Understanding Your DSLR Camera Evening Class £85 Start Dates: 26.01.2015;  11.03.2015

Understanding Your DSLR Camera Saturday Morning Class £85 Start Date: 07.03.2015

1 Day Understanding Your DSLR Camera £95 Dates:  01.02.2015; 01.03.2015; 29.03.2015

Intermediate Photography £97 Start Date 26.02.2015

Flash Photography £85 Start date 05.02.2015

Understanding Lightroom £85 Start Date 03.02.2015

Introduction to Photoshop and PS Elements £97 Start Date 25.02.2015

Composition In Photography – Seeing Pictures £85 Start Date 03.02.2015

Portrait Photography £85 Start Date 10.03.2015

Basics of Landscape, Travel, Flower and B&W Photography Start Date 09.03.2015  £85

 

10 pro tips you can use in any genre of photography

From Digital Camera World, words of wisdom, or it’s obvious really but still worth saying

It doesn’t matter whether you like to shoot landscapes, portraits or still life photography, these ten tips from our guest bloggers at Photoventure  will help you improve your images time and time again…..

©Jane Buekett

©Jane Buekett

1. Keep it simple

As a rule it’s best to keep things as simple as possible. In the studio this may mean using two lights (or even just one) rather than three, or including fewer props, but it’s also a useful thing to remember when composing landscapes and still life.

Avoid complex, confusing scenes and look for compositions that have clean lines and nicely spaced elements.

When large format cameras were more common, many photographers claimed the fact that they showed the scene upside down and laterally reversed helped them improve their composition because they stopped seeing the subject as a recognisable object and instead saw a collection of shapes to be photographed in an attractive arrangement.

Modern cameras show the image correctly orientated (usually even if you review a shot and turn the camera upside-down) so you have to use your imagination to see images as shapes and patterns of light rather than objects.

See the other 9 tips here

20 OF THE MOST IMPORTANT PHOTOGRAPHS IN HISTORY

The title is a bit misleading as the images are those selected from one collection, that of The Royal Photographic Society. The choice therefore is a bit restricted but is still an interesting mix. I would be most interested to hear what you consider the 20 most important photographs of all time from whichever source you like.

The-Hippopotamus-at-the-Zoological-Gardens-1852-Juan-Carlos-Maria-Isidro-Count-de-Montizon-de-Borbon-copyright-NMeM_1080x1080The Hippopotamus at the Zoological Gardens’ by Juan Carlos Maria Isidro Count de Montizon de Borbon, 1852 ©National Media Museum, Bradford

Soldiers-of-the-Sky-1940-Nickolas-Muray-The-RPS-Collection-National-Media-Museum-Bradford-copyright-Nickolas-Muray-Photo-Archives_592x888‘Soldiers of the Sky’ by Nickolas Muray, 1940 ©Nickolas Muray Photo Archives

In 1853, Prince Albert noticed how quickly the world of photography was developing, so urged the Royal Photographic Society to start collecting images quick smart, to be sure they recorded its rapid rise. And so they did. The result? A collection of more than 250,000 images, 8,000 items of photographic equipment and 31,000 books and documents, including some of the greatest examples of photography yet.

Now, for the first time, photography fans can witness some of the best images from the entire body of work. Drawn by Light, an exhibition running from 2 December 2014 to 1 March 2015 at the Science Museum’s Media Space, showcases shots by such high-profile names as Ansel Adams, Madame Yevonde and Lewis Carroll, right up to Don McCullin, Terry O’Neill and Martin Parr. From still lives, nudes and portraits to photo-reportage and landscapes, it spans the gamut of styles.

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‘Afghan Girl’ by Steve McCurry, 1984

Science Museum has selected these 20 images from Drawn by Light,  exclusively for Condé Nast Traveller, for you to lose yourself in.  www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/drawnbylight

Aspen-New-Mexico-1958-Ansel-Adams-The-RPS-Collection-copyright-National-Media-Museum-Bradford_592x888‘Aspen’ by Ansel Adams, 1958 ©National Media Museum, Bradford

Audrey-Hepburn-1950-Angus-McBean-The-RPS-Collection-copyright-National-Media-Museum-Bradford_592x888‘Audrey Hepburn’ by Angus McBean, 1950 ©National Media Museum, Bradford

Bewengungsstudie-Movement-Study-1926-Rudolf-Koppitz-The-RPS-Collection-copyright-National-Media-Museum-Bradford_592x888‘Bewengungsstudie Movement Study’ by Rudolf Koppitz, 1926 ©National Media Museum, Bradford

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‘Nude on Sand, Oceano, 1936” by Edward Weston ©Edward Weston
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Moonrise, Hernandez, New Mexico’ by Ansel Adams, 1941 ©National Media Museum, Bradford

Take a View Landscape photographer of the year 2014

The winners of this year’s Take a View landscape photographer of the year awards have been announced. An exhibition will run for nine weeks starting 1 December on the mezzanine level of Waterloo station in London  The exhibition will run for nine weeks from 1st December 2014 to the 31st January 2015Admission is free

Congratulations to Mark Littlejohn, who becomes the eighth holder of the title, ‘Landscape Photographer of the Year’. Mark’s image of a transient stream flowing down the side of a mountain in Glencoe during a heavy rainstorm captured the attention of the judges and won Mark the title and the £10,000 top prize.

Mark also had two images of the Lake District ‘Highly commended’ by the judges and one ‘Commended’

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University of Sheffield, The Arts Tower, winner of the urban view category Photograph: Daniel Cook/Take A View/PA

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Bowdown berries – Newbury, Berkshire – which won the your view category Photograph: Robert Oliver/Take A View/PA

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Heather in bloom, Roseberry Topping, North Yorkshire, winner of the countryside is great category Photograph: John Robinson/Take A View/PA

The Guardian has more winners here

and there is a full set of winning entries and commended here

 

 

Andy Lee photographer Iceland landscapes

From Bored Panada

As amazing as Iceland’s natural sights are, the sheer amount of photographers that visit there means that a lot of their photos end up looking fairly similar. UK-based photographer Andy Lee, however, has used an interesting technique to ensure that his photographs of Iceland’s stark and proud landscape are especially dramatic and atmospheric.

Lee’s stunning photos, which are from “Blue Iceland” and several other Iceland-focused series, resemble Romantic-era paintings because of their moody atmosphere and dramatic lighting. They were created by shooting with a camera that can pick up infrared light and/or a filter that filters out some or all visible light (emphasizing infrared wavelengths). Digital SLR cameras react to IR light, but many have blockers installed to minimize it. This means that one would either have to remove the blocker or use a darkening IR filter (for more tips on how to use this technique, check outthis article).

This technique can produce very interesting effects, blocking light from some visible wavelengths, emphasizing light from others, and picking up light from some wavelengths invisible to the naked eye. The natural features in Lee’s painting-like photographs stand under a black sky and are eerily illuminated by a seemingly faint and distant sun.

Iceland, a country rich with roaring volcanoes, monolithic glaciers, icy mountains and deep fjords, has become a mecca for photographers looking to capture the raw, mystical power of its natural northern beauty. The ruggedness of and stark contrasts present in Iceland’s landscapes makes them irresistible to photographers like Lee.

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If you like Andy’s landscapes go to his 500px site here, you will not be disappointed

The 10 Best German Photographers You Should Know

Large-format prints, technical perfection and impersonal vision: these are the characteristics of the German photographers commonly known as the Düsseldorf School of Photography, a group of artists that studied with two masters of 20th century photography, Bernd and Hilla Becher – several of them went on to become some of the most successful contemporary artists in the world. Find out more in our curated list of ten German photographers you should know. See the full article here

The Rhine II 1999 by Andreas Gursky born 1955

The Rhine II’, Andreas Gursky | Tate

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Esther Teichmann, from the series ‘Fractal Scars, Salt Water and Tears’ | Courtesy the artist

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Axel Hütte, Raucheck, Austria from the series New Mountains, 2011 © Axel Hütte | Courtesy Fondazione Fotografia

Here for more