Oxford School of Photography

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Category Archives: Exhibition

A century of west African portrait photography – in pictures

The rich tradition of portrait photography in west Africa is explored in a new exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. In and Out of the Studio showcases over 80 images taken from the 1870s to 1970s, ranging from casual shots to formal portraits, and features some of the stars of west African photography such as JD ‘Okhai Ojeikere and Samuel Fosso. The exhibition runs 31 August to 3 January  In The Guardian

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The installation seeks to expand our understanding of West African portrait photography by rendering the broad variety of these practices and aesthetics. It juxtaposes photographs, postcards, real photo postcards, and original negatives taken both inside and outside the studio by amateur and professional photographers active from Senegal to Cameroon and from Mali to Gabon.

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Further details from the Museum website here

Keith Arnatt is proof that the art world doesn’t consider photography ‘real’ art

Sean O’Hagan on photography in The Guardian is always a good place to start when looking for something intriguing, interesting and often challenging. You are not likely to find Sean talking about sunsets, flower or wildlife photography and in this article he highlights an exhibition by Keith Arnatt.

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Portrait of the Artist as a Shadow of His Former Self, 1969-72, by Keith Arnatt. Photograph: © Keith Arnatt Estate. All rights reserved, DACS 2015/Courtesy Sprüth Magers

Keith Arnatt liked to photograph things “everyone else thinks aren’t worth photographing”. These included discarded toys, dog poo, detritus from rubbish tips and the various notes his wife, Jo, left around the house for him.

Seven years after his death in 2008, Arnatt remains a singular – and bafflingly undervalued – presence in British art. A small but illuminating show at Sprüth Magers in London, called Absence of the Artist, provides a glimpse of Arnatt’s early use of a medium he would later embrace with the obsessive devotion of the convert. It is a survey of Keith Arnatt, the pioneering conceptual artist, before he became Keith Arnatt, the pioneering photographer.

Arnatt had already made a name for himself as a mischievous artist when he went to a lecture in 1973 entitled Photography or Art? by David Hurn, who had just set up the photography department at Newport College of Art, in south Wales. “When the lecture was over,” Hurn later wrote, “a man came over and introduced himself, saying ‘I’m Keith Arnatt. Would you help me become a photographer?’”

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Intriguingly, Arnatt had already been using photography in his art practice, making extended pieces like Self-Burial, on display here, which comprises nine images of him slowly disappearing into the earth. Inspired by Hurn’s lecture on the work of Diane Arbus, August Sander and Walker Evans, Arnatt suddenly embraced photography by “mucking in with the students”. As he immersed himself in the history of photography, he started making work that was all his own: odd, slyly humorous and provocative takes on the everyday that were both acutely observational and absurd.

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Keith Arnatt, from the sequence Self-Burial, 1969. Photograph: Courtesy Sprüth Magers/© Keith Arnatt Estate. All rights reserved, DACS 2015

The exhibition is at Sprüth Magers Berlin London

SEPTEMBER 01 – SEPTEMBER 26 2015 Opening hours: Tuesday – Saturday, 10 am – 6 pm

The SM website says The Absence of the Artist betrays the artist’s deadpan wit, wholly characteristic of Arnatt’s response to the various conflicts stimulating the art world throughout the late 1960s. The viewer is presented with a paradox: a sign, posted on a brick wall and photographed in black and white, declares the absence of the artist. Yet by denying his absence, he thrusts himself forward, seemingly emphasising the artist’s role. The Absence of the Artist highlights a fierce ambivalence about the artist’s role that was prevalent at the time. As more sceptical, pluralist ideas about art were starting to replace modernism – and its pantheon of great artists – the role of the artist was subjected to constant investigation. What divides the artist from his work or the ideas that it might produce? Do we even need the actions of an artist to declare something an artwork?

Read more from The Guardian and Sean O’Hagen here

The best photography exhibitions on now

I so love the way  some newspapers, magazines and blogs gather together a list of the exhibitions worth seeing and so thanks to The Telegraph for this, I have also added some other exhibitions that you might find interesting

In no particular order here is a selection of what is on show now:

Audrey Hepburn: Portraits of an Icon, National Portrait Gallery

‘Audrey Hepburn: Portraits of an Icon’, National Portrait Gallery, London WC2, July 2 – Oct 18. Tickets: 020 7766 7344; npg.org.uk. ‘Charade’ will be the featured film on MUBI on July 5. For details, go to telegraph.co.uk/film/mubi

AUDREY HEPBURN: PORTRAITS OF AN ICON 2 July – 18 October 2015, National Portrait Gallery, London *IMAGE TO PROMOTE EXHIBITION ONLY* ... Audrey Hepburn dressed in Givenchy with sunglasses by Oliver Goldsmith by Douglas Kirkland,  1966 © Iconic Images/Douglas Kirkland

AUDREY HEPBURN: PORTRAITS OF AN ICON
2 July – 18 October 2015, National Portrait Gallery, London
*IMAGE TO PROMOTE EXHIBITION ONLY* … Audrey Hepburn dressed in Givenchy with
sunglasses by Oliver Goldsmith by Douglas Kirkland,
1966 © Iconic Images/Douglas Kirkland

Captain Linnaeus Tripe: Photographer of India and Burma, 1852-1860

24 June – 11 October 2015 V & A Photography, Room 38a Admission free

 

 

Linnaeus Tripe, Pugahm Myo: Thapinyu Pagoda, August 20-24, 1855. Lent by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Purchase, The Buddy Taub Foundation, Dennis A. Roach and Jill Roach, Directors, and Alfred Stieglitz Society Gifts, 2012. Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Soldiers and Suffragettes: The Photography of Christina Broom

An enterprising housewife taught herself to use a camera and won the admiration of Queen Mary

Where: Museum of London Docklands
Address: No.1 Warehouse, W India Dock Rd, London E14 4AL
Until: Nov 1

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London Dust

London Dust is a small photography and film exhibition, responding to the redevelopment of the City of London and the fallout from the 2008 financial crisis. As property prices rise, and the pressure to maximise space increases, London’s financial district has seen ever more fanciful towers appear in the skyline.

Blees Luxemburg’s images contrast the idealised, architectural computer-generated visions of London that clad City building sites, with the gritty, unpolished reality.

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Detail from ‘Aplomb (St. Paul’s)’ by Rut Blees Luxemburg –

See more on offer at The Telegraph

Dusseldorf Photography: Bernd And Hilla Becher & beyond

4 September – 3 October 2015 This autumn Ben Brown Fine Arts is pleased to present a major survey of photography originating from the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf after 1976. The exhibition offers an opportunity to see varying interpretations of the German ‘New Objectivity’ style championed by Bernd and Hilla Becher side by side, including meditations on architecture and landscape by their former pupils Candida Höfer, Andreas Gursky, Axel Hütte, Thomas Ruff, Elger Esser and Thomas Struth, also known today as the Düsseldorf School of Photography.

Ben Brown Fine Arts 12 Brook’s Mews, London W1K 4DG T. +44 (0)20 7734 8888 E. info@benbrownfinearts.com http://www.benbrownfinearts.com Monday to Friday: 11am – 6pm Saturdays: 10.30am – 2.30pm

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Bernd And Hilla Becher Gas Tanks

Julia Margaret Cameron: Influence and Intimacy at Science Museum

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Catch a glimpse of some truly pioneering photography as the Science Museum presents Julia Margaret Cameron: Influence and Intimacy.

The exhibition marks the 200th anniversary of Cameron’s birth and features images drawn from the world’s most extensive collection of Cameron photographs, found in the Science Museum Group’s remarkable National Photography Collection.

The innovative artist became famous for her shots of her artistic and literary friends, acquaintances and family members. Her illustrious acquaintances included the likes of Alfred Tennyson, Julia Jackson(mother of Virginia Woolf), Thomas Carlyle and William Holman Hunt.

Cameron deliberately used unconventional methods when taking her shots, avoiding sharp focus and including technical faults to create more expressive images, much to the disdain of the photographic press of the day. The exhibition also features rare objects relating to Cameron’s life, including a daguerreotype portrait of herself, her only surviving camera lens, hand written notes from her autobiography and rare shots taken in Sri Lanka towards the end of her life.

Free  From 24/09/2015  To 28/03/2016

Exhibition Road in South Kensington, London, SW7 2DD

Lee Miller: A Woman’s War at Imperial War Museum

Discover the incredible story behind one of the last century’s most important female war photographers with Lee Miller: A Woman’s War at the Imperial War Museum.

The exhibition looks at the impact that the Second World War had on women’s lives, using the remarkable images taken by Miller throughout the conflict in her perilous role as photographer.

The major exhibition is the first to examine the contrasting ways in which Lee viewed gender, using many of her personal items to tell the compelling story of her career and the important part she played in the war.

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Anna Leska, Polish pilot 1942 by Lee Miller

Coming soon: 15 October 2015 – 24 April 2016

IWM London
Lambeth Road
London
SE1 6HZ

Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year at Royal Observatory Greenwich

See the night sky as you have never seen it before as Astronomy Photographer of the Year returns to the Royal Observatory Greenwich. The Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition is an annual celebration of the most beautiful and spectacular visions of the cosmos by astrophotographers worldwide. In 2015 the competition launched for its seventh year with new categories and more prizes up for grabs. The winning images are showcased at the Royal Observatory Greenwich in an exhibition opening 18 September.

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Aurora over a Glacier Lagoon by James Woodend, UK

Royal Observatory
Blackheath Avenue
Greenwich, SE10 8XJ

See the shortlist here

BP Spotlight: Karen Knorr at Tate Britain

Exhibition bringing together two series of work which combine image and text exploring patriarchal values in the upper middle classes and the aspirations and lifestyle of a privileged minority living in one of the most affluent parts of London.

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Belgravia 1979-81 Karen Knorr born 1954 Presented by Tate Members 2013 and forming part of Eric and Louise Franck London Collection http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/P80334

Belgravia 1979-81 Karen Knorr born 1954 Presented by Tate Members 2013 and forming part of Eric and Louise Franck London Collection

 

 

 

 

 

 

Travel Photographer of the Year

The BBC has an extended article with lots of images from Travel Photographer of the Year This award has been going for some years and attracts a really marvellous set of images from around the world, if you are interested in travel, peoples, landscapes, cities, in fact pretty much everything then the TPOTY site is a must and you should bookmark it now.

This is from the BBC site

From the harsh reality of the natural world, to stunning beauty seen at some of the planet’s remotest locations – the best images from the latest Travel Photographer of the Year competition are now on show in London.

For a photograph to stand out from the crowd, says Caroline Metcalfe of TPOTY‘s judging panel, it must provoke an immediate emotional response.

“It then has to draw me in and make me want to linger for more than a few seconds.”

A former director of photography at Conde Nast Traveller magazine, with a 20-year pedigree in the business, Metcalfe has been looking through some of the images which made the judges’ final selection for TPOTY 2014 – including two sets from Philip Lee Harvey which earned him the top prize.

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Himba Tribe, Namibia – Philip Lee Harvey/www.tpoty.com

 

_84524823_6c48856b-5b56-41f0-8bd2-b547a286c663Lalibela, Ethiopia – Philip Lee Harvey/www.tpoty.com

TPOTY website says: The Travel Photographer of the Year (TPOTY) photo contest is run by photographers for photographers. Whether you are amateur or professional, beginner or expert, young or old, wherever you live in the world, TPOTY is for you!

2015 sees TPOTY’s 13th award, with new categories and new opportunities to showcase the best travel photography. Entries open from 28th May. You can view the latest winners in the 2014 Winners Gallery or in our latest book, Journey Seven.

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Riviera Maya, Mexico – Terry Steeley/www.tpoty.com

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Norway – Piotr Trybalski/www.tpoty.com

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Java, Indonesia – Sue O’Connell/www.tpoty.com

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El Tatio geyser field, Chile – Ignacio Palacios/www.tpoty.com

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Salar de Uyuni (salt flat), Uyuni, Bolivia – Ignacio Palacios/www.tpoty.com

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North of Svalbard in the Arctic – Joshua Holko/www.tpoty.com

All 2014 finalists from Travel Photographer of the Year can be seen at the Royal Geographical Society in Kensington, London, until 5 September 2015.

Our next travel photography course starts in November

Travel Photographer Of The Year Exhibition

TPoY Lacock

Image: Japanese Macaque © Jasper Doest/tpoty.com

An exhibition of images from the Travel Photographer of the Year (TPOTY) awards are to go on show in an outdoor exhibition for the first time at Lacock Abbey, Wiltshire, the birthplace of photography.

These award-winning photographs, submitted by amateur and professional photographers who beat entrants from almost a one hundred countries in 2013, drew some 37,000 visitors when they were displayed in London last summer, giving visitors who may have missed the London exhibition a chance to enjoy them now.

The photographs in the exhibition offer a glimpse into our magnificent and poignant world. From sweeping landscapes to bustling city scenes, from a lion on the hunt to a ‘snow monkey’ having a relaxed bath in Japan and some fascinating moments of human life, these images will take people on a journey around the world.

Running from 5 June to 12 July, Travel Photographer of the Year at Lacock Abbey gives photography fans the chance to view these images in the unrivalled and highly appropriate setting of the National Trust property which is considered the birth place of modern photography where Henry Talbot captured the first photographic negative.

The exhibition will be on show in the abbey’s Tudor courtyard, an historic part of the building’s 800 year history. It was also a location Talbot often used to take pictures and many of his famous photographs, including ‘The Open Door’, were taken there. This year the National Trust team at Lacock closed the courtyard to vehicles, making it a more relaxing and enjoyable space for visitors. TPOTY will be the first event held here.

Travel Photographer of the Year, 5 June to 12 July, daily from 10.30am to 5.30pm, in the Tudor courtyard at Lacock Abbey. National Trust members and under 5s go free. For more information please call 01249 730459 – 

Here is a link to our previous post

Travel photographer of the year 2014 winners – in pictures

There is also a showing of the 2014 winners in London, here is the information on that

2015 exhibition at the Royal Geographical Society in London

24th July until 5th September 2015

One of the joys of doing well in TPOTY is having your images displayed at the TPOTY exhibitions and being seen by thousands, sometimes millions, of people.

The home of the Travel Photographer of the Year exhibitions is the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG). The Society’s gallery is situated close to Hyde Park on the corner of Kensington Gore and Exhibition Road, and adjacent to the Royal Albert Hall, in the heart of London’s museum area.

Exhibition dates:

The 2015 exhibition is open every day from 24th July to 5th September 2015.

Opening hours

Sunday to Thursday – 10.00 to 17.00 hrs

Friday & Saturday – 10.00 – 19.00 hrs

The main exhibition is FREE

We also run a Travel Photography Course, here are the details, next starts 25th June 

 

Vietnam: The Real War by Associated Press photographers – Exhibition

30th April is the anniversary of the fall of Saigon,  The Associated Press is recognizing the significance of the Vietnam War with an extraordinary photo exhibit in London. “Vietnam: The Real War, A Photographic History by The Associated Press” will open April 8 at the Guardian News and Media’s gallery at its Kings Cross headquarters.

To cover the Vietnam War, AP gathered a group of superb photojournalists in its Saigon bureau, creating one of the greatest photographic legacies of the 20th century. From Malcolm Browne’s photograph of the burning monk to Nick Ut’s famous picture of a nine-year-old running from a Napalm attack, these photographs capture the experience and tragedy of people caught in a war of insurgency in which everyone was suspect.
AP won six Pulitzer Prizes for its war coverage, four of them for photography. Now, drawn from AP’s photo history of the conflict, “Vietnam: The Real War,” a selection of these images can be viewed at the exhibit; telling the human story behind the war.
“The Vietnam War left its mark on AP, taking the lives of four of our photographers, but we made an unprecedented commitment to report on it,” said Santiago Lyon, AP’s director of photography. “Thanks to an uncensored press the world saw more of this war than any other. This exhibit now allows an even wider audience access to the photographic record of the tragedy of it.”
The exhibit runs until the end of May 2015 and is open each day from 10.00 to 18.00, Guardian News & Media, 90 York Way, London N1 9GU. Admission is free.

The BBC seems to be upping it’s game in relation to photography, everyday there is a new article or feature and unlike most publications you rarely see a sunset or pictures of ducks. Today they have a series of pictures by Associated Press photographers from the Vietnam War, here is a link to the full article

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Nearly 60,000 US soldiers died in Vietnam, with more than 300,000 injured. For the Vietnamese, though, the figures were far higher, with estimates of more than half a million killed and many millions wounded.

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While in Saigon, Faas trained and mentored young Vietnamese photographers who made many of the war’s defining images. Their daily photos from Vietnam helped inform the world of the traumas faced by people caught in the cross-fire of conflict.

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From a journalist’s perspective the war in Vietnam was unique. It was the first war in modern times without censorship, where reporters and photographers were allowed virtually unrestricted access to the battlefields.

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Another was Nick Ut’s picture of nine-year-old Phan Thi Kim Phuc – a young girl, running naked and terrified down the road after a napalm attack – which became one of the iconic images of the entire conflict.

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During the conflict, AP’s Saigon bureau won six Pulitzer Prizes for its war coverage, four of them for photography.

See the rest of these powerful images here

Here is more from AP  Explore The Real War

 

EXHIBITIONS \ Alexander Gronsky

I like to keep you updated on interesting looking exhibitions, it doesn’t matter where there are as we have followers all over the world, so if you can’t get to see them on the wall you can see them here. I was alerted to this photographer by someone we have featured before, Jane Buekett.

The Wapping Project Bankside is pleased to announce Estonian photographer, Alexander Gronsky’s first exhibition with the gallery.

Gronsky’s Pastoral series of large format photographs of Moscow’s suburban areas are reminiscent of the arcadian images created by 19th century landscape painters and reconstructs them in a way that jars with the romantic representations of a bygone era. Once defining borders becomes blurred in these photographs – the divisions between urban and pastoral, utopian and dystopian and the actors within these spaces are rendered ambiguous. Gronsky’s arresting use of colour and intelligent compositions are alluring, but these layered works are a study of how people inhabit a territory and what becomes evident in these images is the effect human life has on the environment in this Apothocene age.

Included in the exhibition are three works from Gronsky’s Reconstruction series that documents reenactments of historic Russian battles whilst simultaneously rendering them anachronistic with the inclusion of onlookers into the frame, constructed as triptychs, these works are filmic in nature and alludes to a panoramic view of an important battle whilst titles such as “Siege of Leningrad”are reminiscent of a Hollywood film. Continuing Gronsky’s study of perspective, in these works it appears formal whilst the colouring offers a certain flatness to the photographs.

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The images are very reminiscent of the work of Nadav Kander who I really appreciate, we have also featured his work before here and here , you can see more of Kander’s work on his site here

This link will take you to Alexander Gronsky’s site

The exhibition is here

The Wapping Project Bankside
Top Floor, The Bishop’s Palace
Ely House
37 Dover Street
London W1S 4NJ

14th April – 29th May 2015

Salt and Silver: Early Photography 1840 – 1860 Exhibition Tate Britain

This is the first exhibition in Britain devoted to salted paper prints, one of the earliest forms of photography. A uniquely British invention, unveiled by William Henry Fox Talbot in 1839, salt prints spread across the globe, creating a new visual language of the modern moment.

This revolutionary technique transformed subjects from still lifes, portraits, landscapes and scenes of daily life into images with their own specific aesthetic: a soft, luxurious effect particular to this photographic process.

The few salt prints that survive are seldom seen due to their fragility, and so this exhibition, a collaboration with the Wilson Centre for Photography, is a singular opportunity to see the rarest and best early photographs of this type in the world.

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Tate Britain: Exhibition
25 February 7 June 2015  Adult £12.00 (without donation £10.90) Concession £10.50 (without donation £9.50)

Talks and lectures

Friday 20 March 2015, 19.0020.00
Friday 17 April 2015, 18.3020.30

Goa’s first photography festival

Are you off to India anytime in the very near future, going to Goa? There is a photography festival being held there for the first time, Goaphoto runs from 25 February to 7 March. I found information about the festival on the Guardian website , unfortunately the website for the festival is still partly under construction and there isn’t very much to see there but from the Guardian and  we get some information and pictures, here you go

India through a lens: the nation embraces photography as art: For a country so rich in imagery, India has been slow to embrace photography as art. The nation’s first photography festival was held only four years ago, in New Delhi, and since then other cities have followed with their own exhibitions. Goa, although better known for its cheap beach holidays, soft drugs and hippie lifestyle, is due to hold its first festival next month in Ucassaim, Bardez Goa, showcasing more than 75 photographers from India and beyond…..

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The Emergence, 2012: a young slum dweller caught in an accidental, glamorous shaft of light. Photograph: Prateek Dubey

Some photographs bear witness to disappearing traditions, from Mumbai’s trademark Fiat Padmini taxis, which have plied the streets for a century, to the endangered Buddhist tribe of Phaneng, in the easternmost corner of India’s Assam state. Yet the most memorable, perhaps, are those images that capture the extraordinary humour, irony and tenderness of everyday life – not least Mahesh Shantaram’s photo of a group of identically dressed political functionaries in Trivandrum, feverishly campaigning on their mobile phones.

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The Nehruvian Dream: feverish ­campaigning on ­mobile phones during the 2014 national elections. Photograph: Mahesh Shantaram

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Polaroid Composite – India Portrayed. Photograph: Manoj Jadhav

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From the series Goodbye Padmini. Photograph: Aparna Jayakumar

See more here

How I shot an abandoned asylum – An interview with an Urbex Photographer

I found this on the photography pages of The Telegraph,

Urban explorers (Urbex) and their photographs have become extremely popular over the last few years, each post we make about the subject becomes one of our most popular at that time. It is hard to know why such images of desolation and decay are so riveting but they have great currency, at the end of this post I will list our other Urbex posts for you to follow if you wish

Fabiano Parisi talks to Lowenna Waters about photographing crumbling and deserted locations.

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Born in Rome in 1977, Fabiano Parisi began photographing abandoned mental asylums as part of his Psychology degree. It triggered a love affair with deserted locations that has taken him to the United States, Belgium, Germany, the United Kingdom, Eastern Europe and Russia. He’s snapped everything from a disused swimming pool in Woodridge, Illinois, to a derelict church in Żeliszów, Poland.