Oxford School of Photography

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Nikon introduces new DX-format DSLR D5300

From Professional Photographer magazine we hear about a new Nikon DSLR

On sale on 14 November, the D5300 is an upper entry-level DSLR. The camera’s 24.2-megapixel DX-format CMOS sensor is specifically designed with no optical low-pass filter (OLPF) – the result being more detail and texture in images. Photos can be shared fast with its inbuilt Wi-Fi function which connects the camera directly to a smartphone or tablet, and the GPS function adds geo-tags to pictures in-camera. “This new model is bursting with impressive features, from the high ISO (12,800) capability for low light shooting, to the powerful new EXPEED 4 image processing engine, and large vari-angle screen for a unique view,” says Simon Iddon, senior product manager at Nikon. “Built-in Wi-Fi makes it easy to share stunning images with friends and family, plus you can have some fun by tracking your route thanks to the camera’s GPS functionality. Ultimately, the Nikon D5300 is a pleasure to use and raises the standard of images we share.”

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The body only will cost £729.99 and the D5300 kit with 18-55mm VR lens, £829.99

FEATURES LISTED BY NIKON INCLUDE:Built-in Wi-Fi
Photos can be sent directly from the camera to any iOS or Android smart device – after you’ve downloaded the free wireless mobile utility – ready for easy upload to social networking sites like Facebook, Instagram or Twitter. The Wi-Fii function also makes it possible to control the camera remotely using a connected smart device, plus you can preview the scene you’re shooting on the smart device’s screen.Built-in GPS
The D5300’s built-in GPS integrates with the in-camera Wi-Fi function. Images can be geo-tagged simply, without using any external adapters, by logging location information such as latitude, longitude, and altitude in the image’s EXIF data. The GPS logger function works when the camera is turned off, so you can continue to keep track of your route when you’re not taking pictures. Nikon’s View NX 2 software can help create travel on social networking or photo-sharing sites that support GPS.Image quality
At the core of the D5300 is a 24.2-megapixel DX-format CMOS sensor that has been designed without an optical low-pass filter (OLPF) to make the most of every megapixel, to render exactly what the lens sees.High ISO light sensitivity (up to 12,800, extendable to 25,600 equivalent) combined with Nikon’s new image processing engine, EXPEED 4, allows for better photos and movies when shooting in low light. The 2016-pixel RGB metering sensor sends data to the scene recognition system, enabling optimum auto exposure, AF and auto white balance. It has continuous shooting speeds of up to five frames-per-second and a 39-point AF system, which has nine cross-type sensors in the centre……MORE FROM PP

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The always excellent DP Review site has a pre-view of this new camera

Tis the season for iterative updates, apparently. The D5300, Nikon’s second new DSLR in as many weeks comes less than a year after the announcement of its predecessor, the D5200, and while it doesn’t represent a massive upgrade to the older camera it is improved in some meaningful ways.

As Nikon’s ‘advanced beginner’ DSLR, the D5300 takes the D5200’s place between the entry-level D3200 and the enthusiast-targeted D7100 in the company’s APS-C lineup. The D5300 offers 24MP resolution (like its APS-C stablemates), an articulated rear LCD and more physical controls than the D3200, but without the twin-dial interface and professional grade AF system of the decidedly higher market (and much more customizable) D7100.

Both visually and ergonomically the D5300 is a near-clone of its predecessor (it’s fractionally lighter and a tiny bit smaller), but under the hood it is a stronger camera in a couple of important ways. The D5300’s 24MP sensor lacks an anti-aliasing sensor, which – if our experience with the D7100 and D800E is any guide – should give it the edge in terms of resolution over the D5200. We’d expect the difference to be subtle (especially with a kit zoom attached), but it’s always nice to see improvements to critical image quality potential, especially in mid-range models.

The D5300 also offers a beefed-up video mode, which is now capable of true 1080/60p HD video. This, plus the slightly enlarged (3.2in compared to 3in) fully-articulated 1.04 million-dot LCD screen should mean that the D5300 is attractive to videographers as well as stills photographers. Easy to miss, but useful features include built-in Wi-Fi and GPS – both firsts for Nikon’s DSLR lineup. Battery life gets a boost too – according to CIPA figures the D5300 offers an endurance of 600 shots, compared to 500 from the D5200. Remember though that this figure does not take features like Wi-Fi or GPS into account, and we’d expect both to have an impact on battery life.

READ MORE FROM DPR HERE

Nikon have their seasonal cash back offers when you buy new gear

Nikon UK is launching a bumper Christmas promotion, offering cashback on a huge amount of products including selected D-SLR cameras, selected lenses and speedlights, selected Nikon 1 cameras, as well as the EDG binocular range.The promotion is limited to one claim per person per product and will run from 16 October 2013 – 26 January 2014 (inclusive) and all claims must be received by 28 February 2014 in order to qualify. Details here

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