Oxford School of Photography

insights into photography

Portraits: Pakistani victims of Taliban violence

Pakistan based Associated Press photographer Muhammed Muheisen recently created a portrait series of victims of Taliban violence. To many of these men and women, the idea of negotiating with people responsible for so much human pain is abhorrent. Their voices, however, are rarely heard in Pakistan, a country where people have long been conflicted about whether the Taliban are enemies bent on destroying the state or fellow Muslims who should be welcomed back into the fold after years of fighting. Denver Post

APTOPIX Pakistan Talibans Victims

In this Tuesday, July. 31, 2012, photo, Pakistani newspaper seller Mohammed Rafiq, 20, who was injured in a bomb blast on June, 29, 2008, in Swat valley, poses for a picture in Islamabad, Pakistan. To many victims of Taliban violence, the idea of negotiating with people responsible for so much human pain is abhorrent. Their voices, however, are rarely heard in Pakistan, a country where people have long been conflicted about whether the Taliban are enemies bent on destroying the state or fellow Muslims who should be welcomed back into the fold after years of fighting.(AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen)

Pakistan Talibans Victims

In this Saturday, July 7, 2102, photo, Pakistani daily worker Mufeed Ali, 48, who was injured by a remote control bomb at Lahore train station, on April, 24, 2012, reacts while posing for a picture in Lahore, Pakistan. Hazratullah Khan’s right leg was amputated below the knee after he survived a car bombing as he was on his way home from school. His response when asked whether peace talks should be held with the Taliban leaders who ordered attacks like the ones that maimed him is simple: Hang them alive. Slice their flesh off their bodies and cut them into pieces. (AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen)

Pakistan Talibans Victims

In this Monday, July 30, 2012, photo, Pakistani politician Israr Shah, 56, who was injured in a bomb blast in Islamabad on July, 17, 2007, poses for a picture, in Islamabad, Pakistan. To many victims of Taliban violence, the idea of negotiating with people responsible for so much human pain is abhorrent. Their voices, however, are rarely heard in Pakistan, a country where people have long been conflicted about whether the Taliban are enemies bent on destroying the state or fellow Muslims who should be welcomed back into the fold after years of fighting.(AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen)

See the rest of these powerful portraits here

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