Oxford School of Photography

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Monthly Archives: February 2013

Pictures of the Week: February 1, 2013

The always excellent Denver Post brings another selection of images from the week. I try to show a mix of the hopeful, happy and tragic, this week’s offering is mostly the latter, sign of the times?

A woman sits prayerfully while her head is shaved to mourn the late Cambodian King Norodom Sihanouk ahead of his funeral, Thursday, Jan. 31, 2013, in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. The body of Sihanouk who died on Oct. 15, 2012 at age 89, is scheduled to be cremated on Feb. 4, 2013.

Girls cry in front of a makeshift memorial outside the Kiss nightclub where a fire killed over 230 people in Santa Maria, Brazil, Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2013. The repercussions of a tragic nightclub fire in southern Brazil widened Tuesday as mayors around the country cracked down on such venues in their own cities and investigators searched two other nightspots owned by a partner in the club that caught ablaze. Most of the dead were college students 18 to 21 years old, but they also included some minors.

Pictures of the Week is a Denver Post Plog that gathers the strongest photojournalism from around the world.TOPSHOTS-INDIA-RELIGION-HINDU

A young newly initiated ‘Naga Sadhu’ sits after performing evening rituals at the Akhara camp during the Maha Kumbh festival in Allahabad on January 29, 2013. During every Kumbh Mela, the diksha – ritual of initiation by a guru – program for new members takes place. AFP PHOTO/ Sanjay KANOJIA #

APTOPIX Mideast EgyptAn Egyptian protester evacuates an injured boy during clashes near Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, Friday, Jan. 25, 2013. Two years after Egypt’s revolution began, the country’s schism was on display Friday as the mainly liberal and secular opposition held rallies saying the goals of the pro-democracy uprising have not been met and denouncing Islamist President Mohammed Morsi. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra) #

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Roger Barnes rescues a friend’s surfboard from a flooded home in the inner Brisbane suburb of Newmarket on January 28, 2013 as high winds and heavy rains brought by ex-tropical cyclone Oswald have hit the state of Queensland. Helicopters plucked dozens of stranded Australians to safety in dramatic rooftop rescues on January 28 as severe floods swept the northeast, killing three people and inundating thousands of homes. AFP PHOTO / Patrick HAMILTON #

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Matt Gone poses before the opening of the Expotattoo Venezuela 2013 in Caracas, on January 24, 2013. The event will be held in Caracas five more days. AFP PHOTO/JUAN BARRETO #

TOPSHOTS-AFGHANISTAN-UNREST-EDUCATIONAn Afghan girl looks out of her window near an open classroom on the outskirts of Jalalabad on January 30, 2013. Afghanistan has had only rare moments of peace over the past 30 years, its education system being undermined by the Soviet invasion of 1979, a civil war in the 1990s and five years of Taliban rule. AFP PHOTO/ Noorullah Shirzada #

See the full gallery here

Afterlight

Only four images in this set but an interesting idea

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By Jan Kriwol
see the others here

A Nomadic Life: By Photographer Hamid Sardar-Afkhami

From the excellent Anthony Luke blog comes this photo essay

Hamid Sardar-Afkhami is a professional photographer as well as a scholar of Tibetan and Mongol languages who received his Ph.D. from Harvard University. After moving to Nepal in the late 1980’s and exploring Tibet and the Himalayas for more than a decade, he traveled to Outer Mongolia. Seeing the opportunity to create a single important collection concentrating on the last country where the majority of the population are still nomads, Sardar-Afkhami set up a mobile studio camp. With his arsenal of cameras of different formats, he mounts yearly expeditions into the Mongolian outback to document her nomadic traditions.

FalconBoy-Deloun-Bayin-Olgii-2007 Totem-Deer-2-West-Taiga-Hovsgol-2006 BlackPegasus-Deloun-Bayin-Olgii-2007see all the images here

Giles Duley: ‘I lost three limbs in Afghanistan, but had to go back … ‘

Photographer Giles Duley was nearly killed after stepping on a landmine in Afghanistan. Back home, fighting for his life in hospital, he made himself a promise: to return to Kabul to complete his mission of documenting the savage toll that war takes on civilians……..

This is his story. From The Guardian

A few months earlier, I sat in the searing heat of Sudan with Gino Strada, the charismatic chainsmoking surgeon who set up the Italian NGO Emergency, discussing the plight of civilians caught in the Afghan conflict. I was visiting their project in Khartoum, documenting their groundbreaking Salam Cardiac Centre. Over dinner, Gino told me about the work Emergency was doing in Kabul. I had shied away from Afghanistan because I felt so many great photographers were already working there. I’ve always said that if I get somewhere and there’s another photographer there already, I’m in the wrong place. My main interest has been the untold stories of human suffering around the world. However, as Gino explained, with his typical Italian passion, about the plight of civilians caught up in the years of conflict, I realised it was a story I had heard little of. So I resolved at that point to go and document Emergency’s work there, and I made that promise to Gino……….

Afghan boy Ataqullah tries prosthetic legSeven-year-old Ataqullah at the Red Cross limb-fitting centre in Kabul. A year before, while walking to school, he’d stepped on a landmine, losing an arm and leg. Photograph: Giles Duley

While on this embed, one cold morning in February 2011, I stepped on an IED (improvised explosive device), which had me fighting for my life in intensive care for the next two months and left me a triple amputee with only one arm intact……….

Giles Duley with Afghan boy SediqullahGiles Duley with Afghan boy Sediqullah at the Emergency hospital, Kabul. Sediqullah’s hands were damaged when he played with an unexploded fuse. Photograph: Neil Bonner/Minnow films

Read all of this moving and powerful story here If you can’t read there will be a documentary on the tv Walking Wounded: Return to the Frontline will be shown on Channel 4 at 10pm on 21 February

The Observer’s 20 photographs of the week 10.02.2013

The best photographs in news and culture from around the world over the past seven days

Winter weather in Penistone, South Yorkshire

A sheep looks out from its snow covered shed in Penistone, South Yorkshire. Snow and gale force winds returned this week to parts of Britain Photograph: Anna Gowthorpe/PA
Gale force winds battered the seafront at Seaham harbour

Gale-force winds battered the seafront at Seaham harbour in County Durham this week, as winter returned with a vengeance Photograph: Owen Humphreys/PA
Hubble image of LL Ori and the Orion Nebula

Cosmic clouds and stellar winds seen in an image provided by Nasa of LL Orionis and the Orion Nebula Photograph: NASA/ESA/Hubble Heritage Team/HA/EPA

Colour Run, Olympic Park, Sydney

Runners cheer after they finish the Colour Run at Sydney Olympic Park

Runners cheer after they finish the Colour Run at Sydney Olympic Park
Photograph: Daniel Munoz/Reuters

Man Ray Portraits Exhibition London

We recently featured  Man Ray in one of our blog posts here and now there is an exhibition of his portraits at The National Portrait Gallery

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Man Ray Portraits is the first major museum retrospective of this innovative and influential artist’s photographic portraits.

Born Michael Emmanuel Radnitzky in Philadelphia in 1890, Man Ray initially taught himself photography in order to reproduce his own works of art. In 1912 he began to change the signature on his paintings from ER to Man Ray, and the Radnitzky family adopted this shorter surname.

Man Ray’s earliest photographs date from around 1916, when he documented his own Dada self-portrait and made portraits of Marcel Duchamp. Man Ray’s support and promotion of avant-garde artists was formalised in 1920, when American patron Katherine Dreier invited Man Ray and Duchamp to establish the Société Anonyme, America’s first contemporary art collection.

Focusing on his career in America and Paris between 1916 and 1968, the exhibition highlights Man Ray’s central position among the leading artists of the Dada and Surrealist movements and the significant range of contemporaries, celebrities, friends and lovers that he captured: from Marcel Duchamp and Pablo Picasso to Kiki de Montparnasse, Lee Miller and Catherine Deneuve.

Featuring over 150 vintage prints and key works from international museums and private collections, the exhibition also demonstrates Man Ray’s use of revolutionary photographic techniques and early experiments with colour, as well as surveying his published work in leading magazines such as Vogue and Vanity Fair.

7th February until the 27th May NPG  Full details of the exhibition can be found here

A Brief Moment in Time

London is one of those places, what we Brits would call a “Marmite place” -you either love it or you hate it. Maybe it’s not quite that clear cut but, it is a city of diversity, from poor to affluent, from run down inner city areas to modern apartments, galleries to street art.

Most Londoners tend to all agree on one thing, where they live is the best part; North of the River Thames is better than the South, the East End is the real London etc.

The reality is they are all right, only South West is better than the rest!

You want proof?

Let’s take a winter stroll around Richmond Park. The park was originally created as a hunting ground for deer in 1529 and is currently home to around 630 Red and Fallow deer. Most of the year they are fairly friendly and…

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A Digital Quarterly Magazine for Creative Photographers

Over at OSP Towers we really like the ebooks and other output from Craft & Vision, not only are they exceptional value but also expertly written and lavishly illustrated. All of the books, you can see them by clicking the link to the right, have something valuable to say and you would learn technical and creative skills for less than a cup of coffee. Now they have a quarterly magazine and here is the information.

PQ_HEADER_MAILCHIMP PhotoIssue2_Cover_260The newest issue of PHOTOGRAPH—a digital quarterly magazine for creative photographers—is now available!

This is a gorgeous, ad-free magazine full of great photographs from exceptional photographers, and articles from photographers and authors who understand that this is not only a technical pursuit but an artistic one and write as much from the heart as they do from their expertise.

Issue Two includes featured portfolios and interviews with Martin Bailey, Andy Biggs, and Chris Orwig, as well as articles from some of my most trusted colleagues on topics like composition, post-processing, inspiration, editing, printing, and yes, even gear. Curious about what’s inside? Download the table of contents. See more sample spreads.

You can purchase Issue Two of PHOTOGRAPH for USD $8 by clicking any image above, or by visiting Craft & Vision. As with everything we offer we aim to knock the content out of the ballpark and do so at exceptional value. So we’re offering a one-year subscription for $USD 24 – that’s four issues for the price of three.

I really believe the best way to learn photography is to study exceptional photographs, and to listen to voices that not only know the craft, but practice the art of photography. I hope PHOTOGRAPH inspires you the way it has already inspired us.

David duChemin

Veolia Environnement Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Wildlife and environment are the most common subjects students tell me they are interested in. Photographing animals is tough; difficult places, hours if not days of waiting around and expensive equipment are all things that that make it difficult. Enjoying the work of those that can manage to hit all of these points is still enjoyable and this exhibition at the Natural History MuseumCromwell Rd, London, SW7 5BD This exhibition is on show until 3rd March

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Paul Nicklen (Canada)

Bubble-jetting emperors

This was the image Paul had been so hoping to get: a sunlit mass of emperor penguins charging upwards, leaving in their wake a crisscross of bubble trails. The location was near the emperor colony at the edge of the frozen area of the Ross Sea, Antarctica. It was into the only likely exit hole that he lowered himself. He then had to wait for the return of the penguins, crops full of icefish for their chicks. Paul locked his legs under the lip of the ice so he could remain motionless, breathing through a snorkel so as not to spook the penguins when they arrived. Then it came: a blast of birds from the depths. They were so fast that, with frozen fingers, framing and focus had to be instinctive. ‘It was a fantastic sight’, says Paul, ‘as hundreds launched themselves out of the water and onto the ice above me’ – a moment that I felt incredibly fortunate to witness and one I’ll never forget.