Oxford School of Photography

insights into photography

Everything Was Moving: Photography from the 60s and 70s

The autumn is a great time for the arts, creative endeavour always finds it’s feet between September and November. In the summer we get the main players, blockbuster exhibitions, new albums by established artists and the big summer films but it is the autumn when things really matter.

This autumn there are a number of exhibitions hitting London and the first to bring to your attention is this show of documentary photography at The Barbican.

Phil Coomes on the BBC website has a review of the show, here is some of what he has to say

It could be argued the photography came of age in the swinging 60s. The men and women behind the cameras became household names and amateur photographers enjoyed access to affordable high quality cameras and film.

This photographic prosperity progressed into the next decade as photographers pushed the boundaries and began to explore new methods of working, and news photographers were able to document a world re-shaping itself at the height of the Cold War.

A new exhibition at the Barbican in London, Everything was Moving: Photography from the 60s and 70s explores the shifting political and social landscape of that time through the work of a number of photographers.

The exhibition is a must see for anyone remotely interested in documentary photography with large bodies of work from photographers like Bruce Davidson, David Goldblatt, Li Zhensheng, Ernest Cole and Raghubir Singh.  Read more from Phil here

Malick Sidibe, A Ye-ye posing,1963 (© Malick Sidibé. Courtesy Fifty One Fine Art Photography, Antwerp)

Raghubir Singh, Pilgrim and Ambassador, Prayag, Uttar Pradesh, 1977

Bruce Davidson, Black Americans, New York City. From the series New York (Life), 1961-65. (© Bruce Davidson / Magnum Photos)

The exhibition details are 13 September 2012 – 13 January 2013 Barbican Art Gallery

Further information can be found on the Barbican website here

 

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